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Statement by Minister Ng on signing of Canada-United Kingdom Trade Continuity Agreement

By on June 16, 2021

first_imgStatement by Minister Ng on signing of Canada-United Kingdom Trade Continuity Agreement From: Global Affairs CanadaThe Honourable Mary Ng, Minister of Small Business, Export Promotion and International Trade, today issued the following statement regarding the signing of the Canada-United Kingdom Trade Continuity Agreement:The Honourable Mary Ng, Minister of Small Business, Export Promotion and International Trade, today issued the following statement regarding the signing of the Canada-United Kingdom Trade Continuity Agreement:“Canada welcomes the signing of the new Canada-United Kingdom Trade Continuity Agreement, which will support good, middle-class jobs in Canada and provide stability for businesses of all sizes.“At a time of great uncertainty amid COVID-19, this continuity and predictability is crucial for all Canadians.“This transition agreement preserves the main benefits of the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement, including the elimination of tariffs on 98% of products exported to the United Kingdom.“Canada and the United Kingdom will now move forward with their respective domestic procedures toward the ratification and implementation of the new trade agreement.“Our government looks forward to introducing and debating legislation in the House of Commons as soon as possible so that we can deliver the continuity Canadians need.“We also look forward to launching negotiations of a new comprehensive free trade agreement with the United Kingdom in the near future, with a focus on supporting small businesses, women, the environment and digital trade.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:agreement, business, Canada, covid-19, digital, environment, Export, free trade, future, Government, International trade, legislation, Minister, Small Business, trade, United Kingdomlast_img read more

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WHO and UK commit £1m to support Egypt in against COVID-19

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first_imgWHO and UK commit £1m to support Egypt in against COVID-19 The United Kingdom is committing £1m through the World Health Organization to support the Egyptian government’s response to COVID-19.The funds will strengthen the Ministry of Health and Population’s rapid response, surveillance, and infection and prevention control capacities for COVID-19. The fund will also allow the WHO to provide essential supplies and equipment, including Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for health personnel, disinfectants, and laboratory equipment such as safety cabinets, sampling kits and rapid tests.Through the fund, the WHO will also provide e-training to staff in the rapid response teams at governorate and district levels. The training will equip them with the essential skills required to operate in the field, including case detection and surveillance, contact tracing, and infection control.In July this year, the British Ambassador to Egypt Sir Geoffrey Adams, and Minister of International Cooperation Dr Rania El-Mashat, set out the key elements of the UK’s engagement with Egypt in their shared fight against COVID-19. The two governments are working hard to address the immediate medical needs of both Egypt and the UK by keeping essential trade flowing. In April, Egypt fulfilled an export agreement with the UK, sending shipments of medical gowns to support the UK.Regarding this new joint project, Sir Geoffrey Adams said:W> e are committed to leading the way in supporting Egypt through the COVID-19 crisis. This global challenge is unlike any other and I am delighted that the UK and Egypt are intensifying their bilateral development cooperation at this time, including on the vital issue of healthcare.Dr Naeema Al Gasseer, WHO Representative in Egypt, said:The WHO welcomes the solidarity and support from the UK to augment Egypt’s efforts in its fight to overcome the COVID-19 pandemic, both through strengthening the public health system and by protecting the health of its people. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:agreement, Ambassador, covid-19, detection, Egypt, Government, healthcare, infection, Ministry of Health, public health, surveillance, UK, UK Government, United Kingdom, WHO, World Health Organizationlast_img read more

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Together more than ever this Youth Week – Wollongong

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first_imgTogether more than ever this Youth Week – Wollongong Wollongong City Council is celebrating Youth Week from 16 to 24 April with Activate — a live music and light activation event, a special photography exhibition, ‘Speak. Share. Change.’ forums, Laser Tag and creative Library workshops.Youth Week is an annual celebration that recognises the important issues that impact our young people, celebrate their successes, and offers opportunities to showcase the achievements of our young people.Wollongong City Lord Mayor Councillor Gordon Bradbery AM said that this year’s theme together more than ever was a timely remember to reach out and get involved in your community.“With the impact of COVID still felt by many people, we know that mental health is a common problem for some of us, especially our young people,” Cr Bradbery said.“As we celebrate Youth Week, it’s important that we find ways to encourage our young people get involved by participating in the great opportunities available in their community. We’re challenging young people to reach out to friends and family, take part in a free event and share your thoughts on the issues that affect you.”Join us as we celebrate Youth Week by participating in one of our free activities, events and programs.WHAT’S ONActivate: a sound and light celebrationCome with us on a sound and light journey as we celebrate young people and live music! Wollongong Youth Centre and surrounding garden will come alive for an evening of light and sound projections, live music, installation and a free BBQ.Tickets for the indoor live music are free and available from the Youth Services Facebook page or Eventbrite. We’ll ask attendees to simply check in using the Service NSW app or QR code on arrival.This is an all-ages, family friendly and alcohol-free event.Keep an eye on the Youth Services Facebook page for live music line-up details.WHATWHENWHEREActivateFriday 23 April, 6-10pmWollongong Youth Centre & MacCabe Park‘I love a bike city because…’ photography exhibitionWe’re asking our younger residents to share what they love about bike riding in Wollongong. Young people between the ages of 12 to 24 years are encouraged to submit an image that captures what they love about bike riding in their community.To be considered for the ‘I love a bike city because…’ exhibition, you must be a young person between the ages of 12 to 24 years living in the Wollongong Local Government Area.Submissions close 5pm Friday 16 May 2021. The exhibition will be launched at the Wollongong Youth Centre in June 2021.Find out how you can submit an entry into the exhibition by visiting the ‘I love a bike city because…’ webpage.Celebrate Youth Week at your LibraryWollongong City Libraries are holding free events for young people to learn new skills and have fun. Come along to learn the basics of costume design or bring your friends for a game of Laser Tag among the Library shelves.Bookings are essential as places are limited. Visit Eventbrite to secure your free ticket.WHATWHENWHEREIntroduction to Costume DesignTuesday 20 April, 5-6.30pmThirroul Library, 352-358 Lawrence Hargrave DriveLaser TagFriday 30 April, 6pm & 7pmWollongong Library, 41 Burelli StreetSpeak. Share. Change. forumsWe’re hosting forums at local high schools and the Wollongong Youth Centre to encourage young people to express their ideas and views to contribute to Council decisions that impact their lives, now and into the future.Participants in the ‘Speak. Share. Change. forums will help inform the review of Our Wollongong 2028 Community Strategic Plan as well as services provided by Wollongong Youth Services. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Australia, BBQ, Exhibition, Facebook, gordon, Government, high schools, Lawrence, local council, Local Government, mental health, NSW, participants, Service NSW, Thirroul, Wollongong, Wollongong City Council, young, Youthlast_img read more

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Colorado business confidence inches higher going into third quarter, says CU-Boulder Leeds School

By on June 14, 2021

first_img Published: July 2, 2014 The Koelbel Building on the CU-Boulder campus houses the Leeds School of Business, whose Business Research Division produces quarterly economic indexes, biannual outlooks and more. (Photo by Patrick Campbell/University of Colorado) Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail The confidence of Colorado business leaders remains positive and has slightly increased going into the third quarter of 2014, according to the most recent Leeds Business Confidence Index, or LBCI, released today by the University of Colorado Boulder’s Leeds School of Business.The third quarter LBCI posted a reading of 61.2, an increase from 61 last quarter.While both large and small employers were notably positive heading into the new quarter, large employers (with 50 or more employees) expressed greater optimism with an index of 64 compared to 58.8 for small employers.Expectations measured positive — at 50 or higher — for all of the metrics within the index, which include the national economy, state economy, industry sales, industry profits, capital expenditures and hiring plans.“Business leaders’ reaffirmed confidence heading into the third quarter despite a dismal quarter one GDP report,” said economist Richard Wobbekind, executive director of the Leeds School’s Business Research Division, which conducts the LBCI. “Panelists’ perceptions of the state economy outperforming the national economy are in fact grounded in the reality that the state economy is one of the best economies in the nation.”The across-the-board positive standings represent 11 consecutive quarters of positive expectations, according to the LBCI — a report that’s now in its 11th year.“Increased confidence coincides with increasing home prices, employment gains, rebounding household income and falling foreclosure rates,” said Wobbekind.Confidence in capital expenditures saw the greatest gain of 1 point to 59.6, up from 58.6 last quarter. Confidence in the state economy slipped to 65.9, down from 66.7 last quarter — the greatest decrease in the report.Still, confidence in the state economy outpaces confidence in the national economy — a 37-quarter trend in the LBCI — which held steady at 57.5 from the second quarter to the third quarter.The sales index measured 63.4 going into the third quarter, up from 62.7 in the second quarter. Confidence in profits was virtually flat at 61.2, down from 61.3 last quarter.Though hiring expectations also were virtually flat at 59.5, down from 59.6 last quarter, employment in Colorado has recorded 43 months of year-over-year growth.While Colorado employment figures vary greatly by industry, labor markets in all of the state’s metropolitan areas saw growth in May compared with a year earlier. The top three areas showing growth are the Greeley (+5.3 percent), Boulder (+3.2 percent) and Fort Collins-Loveland (+2.9 percent each) Metropolitan Statistical Areas, or MSAs.Employment growth also was recorded in the following MSAs: Denver-Aurora-Broomfield (+2.8 percent), Pueblo (+1.5 percent), Grand Junction (+1.3 percent) and Colorado Springs (+0.4 percent). The Colorado Springs and Grand Junction MSA are the only two areas that have not regained prerecession employment levels in Colorado.Statewide, the biggest employment gains in May compared with the same month last year were in the construction, leisure and hospitality, and mining and logging industries.For more information about the Leeds School’s Business Research Division and the third-quarter report for 2014 visit http://leeds.colorado.edu/brd.Contact: Richard Wobbekind, [email protected] Brian Lewandowski, Leeds School of Business, [email protected] Elizabeth Lock, CU-Boulder media relations, [email protected] Categories:AcademicsBusiness & EntrepreneurshipCampus CommunityNews Headlineslast_img read more

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Brainwaves transcript: Artificial intelligence can love you, kill you, but can’t replace you

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first_img Published: Feb. 18, 2020 Paul Beique:  Welcome to Brainwaves, a podcast about big ideas produced at the University of Colorado Boulder. I’m your host this week, Paul Beique. There’s no shortage of news coverage of artificial intelligence. From Amazon, to China, to robotic relationships.Announcer: I have an appointment with Harmony, the world’s first sex robot. “I am already taking over the world one bedroom at a time.”  Paul:  But if we’ve learned anything from the movies, artificial intelligence might have a few downsides. From “2001: A Space Odyssey”:  “Open the pod bay doors, HAL.” HAL:  “I’m sorry, Dave, I’m afraid I can’t do that.” Dave:  “What’s the problem?” HAL:  “I think you know what the problem is just as well as I do.”Dave:   “What are you talking about, HAL?” Paul:  That’s HAL, the robotic antagonist from “2001: A Space Odyssey.” What HAL’s talking about are the unforeseen limitations of AI. Let’s start there this week. Executive Producer Andrew Sorensen talked with research scientist Janelle Shane about AI’s shortcomings.Andrew Sorensen:  Janelle Shayne, author of the book “You Look Like a Thing and I Love You.” This book is about artificial intelligence and specifically about some of the gaps in what artificial intelligence can’t do. What can artificial intelligence not do? Where are we limited right now?Janelle Shane:  We are limited to really simple, well-defined problems. Because the algorithms we’re dealing with actually, if you look at raw mental power, it’s more along the lines of what an earthworm can do. So trying to understand the broader world, the context like that, is a really hard thing for today’s algorithms to do.Andrew:  Tell us about the title of that book, “You Look Like a Thing and I Love You.” Where did that title come from.?Janelle Shane:  That was an experiment when I was trying to get a text-generating neural network to generate pickup lines, and this was the best it did. Andrew:  That was the best pick up line it came up. So, in your mind, what does that kind of show us as far as where we’re at with artificial intelligence, and what do we need to keep in mind, as there are a lot of people out there who are very worried about what artificial intelligence can do, and then on the other side we’re seeing a lot of companies sell these artificial intelligence solutions to a lot of the problems that we face. Janelle Shane:  Yeah, so, I think a lot of people tend to think of AI as a kind of science-fiction level AI like Skynet level and so forth. And what we have today is a lot less complicated than that. It’s unlikely to get complicated anytime soon. In fact, what we have to worry about a little bit more are algorithms that don’t really understand what we’re trying to get them to do and accidentally solve the wrong problem, copy human bias when they shouldn’t copy human bias, or, you know, goof up and not recognize a pedestrian when they should.Andrew:  How far off do you think we are with artificial intelligence from something that can be maybe a little more reliable? Janelle Shane:  It depends. I mean, you can build something that’s fairly reliable now at certain tasks. Like we’ve got them tagging photos in our cell phones, we’ve got them delivering search results, doing autocomplete. And so they work well for a lot of different tasks, but what we’re running into is there are some things that we don’t realize are very difficult like, you know, flexibly answering a customer’s questions, until we try to build a machine to do it and realize, oh, there’s a lot of complex stuff that we humans are doing without even thinking about it. Andrew:  So to that end, what is your advice to people as they think about AI and as they are being hawked a lot of products that have artificial intelligence solutions behind them?Janelle Shane:  Yeah, I think it’s to remember that these algorithms can’t make moral decisions by themselves and that they copy human behavior. So if the human behavior is flawed, these algorithms will copy it unknowingly.Andrew:  OK, thank you so much.Janelle Shane:   Thank you so much. Paul:  Janelle Shane is a research scientist at Boulder Nonlinear Systems, and she’s the author of a book on artificial intelligence called “You Look Like a Thing and I Love You.”  It’s true that machines can only do what people want them to do, and they can’t decide what is ethical and what is not. When that machine is designed to kill, the prospects become very frightening very quickly. The New York Times recently published a story and a documentary on AI’s increasing role in the military. Our next guest is Jonah Kessel, the Times’ director of cinematography. He produced the documentary. It starts with a shot of Kessel sitting in an orange leather chair against a stark black background. He’s looking at his phone. Jonah Kessel narration:  I love that I can unlock my phone with my face. And that Google can predict what I’m thinking. And that Amazon knows exactly what I need. It’s great that I don’t have to hail a cab or go to the grocery store. Actually, I hope I never have to drive again. Or navigate, or use cash, or clean, or cook, or work or learn. But what if all this technology was … trying to kill me? Paul:  Jonah, welcome to Brainwaves. Jonah Kessel:  Thanks for having me. Paul:  And, full disclosure, Jonah was a student of mine years ago at Saint Michael’s College outside of Burlington, Vermont. In the documentary, you travel to a Russian arms expo where some AI-equipped weapons are on display. Did anything surprise you about what you found there? Jonah Kessel:  I think the thing that surprised me most was that they were kind of, first, showing them at all. Some of these weapons are considered in a morally gray area and specifically at the Kalashnikov booth. Kalashnikov, as you know, is like a world-famous icon of killing. You know, their guns are — the AK-47 is probably one of the most infamous guns in the world. And when we saw this gun that they had there, it was a turret hooked up to facial recognition software. And it took me a minute to understand it. I was like, huh. It was on display and I saw the turret, I saw the machine gun on it. And I saw what it was hooked up to, and it was pointing at me. And after it kind of registered what was going on, I was like, wow, this is amazing. And so I immediately went, you know, to the sales people and to their PR people. I was like, hey, can we ask you about this weapon? We’re really curious how it works. And, you know, they chatted for a second and eventually they were like, “Absolutely not. Go away.” And we’re like, well, you know, we have press passes. We’re here you know as legitimate members of the press. You know, we’d really like to speak to somebody about this. And they said, well, you know, come back in an hour. And we came back in an hour, and they said come back tomorrow. And we came back tomorrow, and then it was gone. So this weapon, which clearly drew our interest, as soon as we started asking about it, they didn’t feel comfortable enough let alone talking about it, but that they felt the need to put it away. And I think that speaks volumes to its perceived threat and its perceived use. Paul:  You make the point in the documentary that we’ve been here before with military technology. The Gatling gun was originally designed to save lives. Nuclear and chemical and biological weapons were supposed to be a deterrent but they’ve all been used to kill people. Do you see this piece as a kind of warning not to go down this same path again with artificial intelligence? Jonah Kessel:  Yeah, absolutely. I think, you know, one of my passions in journalism is to raise red flags. You know, this piece is more on the analysis side than anything else. But it’s not up to us as journalists to say this is good or bad. But it certainly is up to us to say, “Hey, this needs more attention.” And if we look at lessons from the past, you know, such as the Gatling gun, clearly our inventions don’t always have the intentions we predict. And in the case of autonomous weapons, you know, the AI scientists are screaming don’t do this, and yet we are not listening to them. Paul:  The United Nations does not come off particularly well in this documentary. They’re portrayed as talking in circles about definitions and rules while tech companies and nations are rapidly developing autonomous weapons. What struck you about that dichotomy? Jonah Kessel:  Yeah, so I went to, I think it was five days of meetings at the United Nations in Geneva. But when I was in there I started noticing it was the pleasantries which first started to really get to me. That, you know, whenever someone started talking, the first 30 seconds were, you know, left for pleasantries: Thank you for having us, thank you for letting us speak, Your Excellency, you know. And the same thing would happen in return with the chair would talk. And the amount of time that was being wasted kind of, you know, shaking each other’s hands, if you will, really started to be in juxtaposition to what I had seen the previous couple day at that weapons fair. I’d been talking to technologists and developers about all this stuff and all the things they’re working for, and all of a sudden you show up at the, you know, the highest level of international governance. And people are just thanking each other. And the scene started to build in my head while I was there in the meetings. I could see what I want to do with it and how to kind of juxtapose these things to kind of show we’re not acting fast enough and certainly not at a bureaucratic level. Paul:  Children actually play a pretty significant role in this documentary. You show several scenes of children examining, almost playing with, these weapons systems. For me, those were some of the most poignant scenes. What was the thought behind including children in a story about AI in the military? Jonah Kessel:  Certainly, when thinking about the future, there’s probably no more potent sign than children. They’re also a symbol, or they acted, I was intending them to act as a symbol of cultural differences. So, this is in Russia, and I think this is an important part of the story, which is a little bit subtle, but that we just don’t all have the same values. And that can be pretty tricky if, you know, let’s say the United States, we’re having these conversations about ethics as it relates to weapons, but those same conversations aren’t necessarily happening in other places. And if our value systems are so different, perhaps one country will make these weapons, whereas another won’t because of, you know, their own values. And that creates a kind of an unevenness to warfare, which could potentially be dangerous and actually is one reason why people don’t want to stop making these things, because they’re afraid if they stop making them, their competitor or their adversary might continue to make them, giving them an advantage should they go to war. Paul:  One of your subjects makes the point that we really don’t have to wait for this technology, it’s already being created by commercial tech companies. He also says that we can teach military machines to be legally right but getting a morally right is a lot more difficult. Can you tell us about the example he used. Jonah Kessel:  Yeah, so, Paul Scharre is a former Army Ranger and he became a policy guy in the end. He’s in a think tank in D.C. And in the story, Paul describes a young girl — she could have been 4 or 5 years old — that was spying on him and his teammates. And you know, by the rules of law, by the rules of war, she was a valid enemy combatant. And the rules of war don’t have an age limit on who’s a combatant, so she was a valid target. And his point he makes with this young girl he sees in Afghanistan is that, should he have been a machine programmed by algorithms to follow the rules of war, that machine would have shot this little girl. Now, he knew that was wrong and he didn’t shoot her. But a machine, could you program a machine to know the difference between right and wrong, even if that means breaking the law? And I think there’s something, a couple really interesting points here. One is certainly that what’s right and wrong is not always clear. Another thing is that sometimes doing the right thing means breaking the law. And a third thing is just the uncertainty that is required for judgment. Paul once told me: The entire time I was in Afghanistan, when someone came up to talk to me, I could never be totally sure if this person was just a civilian who wanted to say hi, or maybe they didn’t understand me, or maybe it was actually someone who wanted to kill me. And I was never quite certain. And this is the reality of modern warfare today. You know, we’re not living in, you know, in World War II or World War I times where you could identify your enemy by their helmet or by their uniforms. War is much different now, and the battleground is not as clear. So these are real challenges for AI, if we think about making machines that are going to carry out warfare and follow rules, because they’re all going to be governed by rules which we give them. Paul:  Jonah, thank you very much for your work and thanks a lot for joining us today on Brainwaves. Jonah Kessel:  Great, thanks for having me. Jonah Kessel:  Jonah Kessel is the director of cinematography at The New York Times. You can find links to the documentary in the podcast description. Paul:  Facial recognition as part of a weapons system might sound frightening but even the facial recognition in phones and on Facebook can have a hard time figuring out who we are. Executive Producer Andrew Sorensen discussed the weaknesses of facial recognition — particularly around gender identity — with Morgan Klaus Scheurman, a PhD student in information science at CU Boulder. Andrew:  Morgan Klaus Scheurman, thank you and welcome to the showMorgan Klaus Scheurman:  Yeah, thanks for having me.Andrew:  So we’re talking about artificial intelligence. You’ve done some research on to artificial intelligence and facial recognition. How commonly used is artificial intelligence in this facial recognition software? Morgan Klaus Scheurman:  Well, I would say that facial recognition and facial analysis more broadly is just an instance of AI, so all facial analysis is AI, I guess I would say. Andrew:  What are we looking at as far as where is this technology currently? In your research you found some pretty serious shortcomings.Morgan Klaus Scheurman:  Well, I guess I can say for some listeners that are maybe not as familiar with this technology that maybe facial recognition is the most familiar use case people know. So, how you unlock your phone, how you tag your friends on Facebook. We’re all kind of familiar with that instance of facial recognition. But in my research I looked at facial classification. So that’s when a system will analyze aspects of an image, aspects of a face, and then try to classify certain characteristics of that face, including things like gender, ethnicity, age. Those sorts of features.Andrew:  And previous research showed that there are a lot of issues around minority groups, particularly women, who have darker skin. Is that right?Morgan Klaus Scheurman:  Yes, so, previous research has been done to show that women with darker skin tend to be misclassified as male more often than people with lighter skin types in general. Andrew:  And then what you found in your research, can you explain a little bit of that? Morgan Klaus Scheurman:  So, in my research, I looked at gender across different gender identities. So I looked at cisgender men, cisgender women, transgender man, transgender women, and nonbinary genders such as gender queer, agender. And so we found that facial classification broadly misclassifies trans people far more than it misclassifies cisgender people. And then these systems aren’t built to recognize anything beyond male or female so it’s actually not possible for it to accurately classify anything outside of the gender binaryAndrew:  So the population that identifies is trans is still, I think, pretty small, somewhere in the kind of single digits for the whole population. Why should the average person really take stock of that and be concerned?Morgan Klaus Scheurman:  Yeah, so, I guess if we’re talking about, like, why would any person on the street be concerned is, on one hand, it’s really encoding into these systems what a normal woman and a normal man should look like. So it’s very limited in the way that it views gender for every person that it comes into contact with. So if you fall outside of that, like maybe you like to wear your hair short more often, or you just kind of have what a computer would see as a more masculine appearance as a woman, you may be misclassified. So I find it very interesting. This is something that I also tested on myself, and when I interact with people in real life, when I talk, generally people will say “he” or “sir,” but these different systems actually classified me differently. So, like, Amazon classified me as female, and Microsoft classified me as male. So you can also kind of see that depending on the system you’re interacting with, it might see you as a totally different gender, so it could affect any person, really.Andrew:  And you, I know our audience can’t see Morgan right now. He does have long hair but he’s wearing a flannel and a NASA shirt.Morgan Klaus Scheurman:  It really depends on the day. I’m definitely one of those people, too, who’s more maybe genderfluid, as you would say. Like, I wouldn’t consider myself as maybe falling into the norm like short hair, wearing jean jackets every day or something. Andrew:  But once you interact with you, it’s not unapparent that you’re a man.Morgan Klaus Scheurman:  Well, I think it’s very interesting, too. These systems, they’re really trying to be as good as humans are at this, but they don’t have as many context clues, and then there’s kind of many notions around gender now that your appearance doesn’t necessarily map to your gender identity. So me and you, we could have a conversation about that, right, and I could say, well, this, the way you perceive me is not the way that I feel, right? But you can’t really do that with a computer, and there are no opportunities right now for you to even intervene in most of these systems. A lot of us don’t even know it’s happening.Andrew:  And what are some of the problematic kind of use cases were facial recognition is being used where you find what you found with their limitations to be an issue.Morgan Klaus Scheurman:  Yeah, so, I would say that the majority of how it’s being used as in either media or in marketing. So, in that case it’s more about who are you misrepresenting, and who are you erasing from the reality of who’s interacting with products, or who’s on screen or whatever. In other cases, facial recognition or facial classification are being used in, like, security scenarios or policing. And usually that’s more on the recognition, one-to-one individual matching use case. But it is interesting to see maybe your documentation, your ID, or what’s been recorded in a database by police doesn’t match your current gender identity. So I could see that as being very problematic and very dangerous for people who already kind of have higher levels of violence generally. Trans people face higher levels of violence in the general population. Andrew:  So we were talking a little bit before this interview, and you’ve had some pretty big companies who were involved in this space reach out to you to learn a little bit more about your research. Who has been reaching out to you and what have they been asking?Morgan Klaus Scheurman:  So, I don’t know if I want to say which companies have a reaching out to me on a podcast, but basically some bigger tech companies that are using gender classification in their facial analysis softwares have reached out to understand what directions they think they should be moving in, in terms of gender classification, and kind of in many ways talking to us about the use cases that their clients are currently using it for. But I think the companies and the people in the companies actually are thinking a lot about this problem. As society, you know, trans rights and different views of gender are becoming more apparent, I don’t think these companies have been unaware of this issue.Andrew:  So to that end, that they are reaching out, they are looking at the problem, does that give you some hope for the future of facial recognition that it might be a little more accurate and not create some of these problematic scenarios where, you know, maybe you’re being marketed women’s products when you identify as a man?Morgan Klaus Scheurman:  Yeah, I think that’s actually an interesting question, because I’m not necessarily a huge proponent of facial recognition anyway, so in terms of making it more accurate, there is a lot of concern from different marginalized groups, and not just trans people but also people of color, about the more accurate it is maybe the more dangerous it is to those groups especially in terms of policing when surveillance and things like that. I do think that there are some use cases that are promising. So, if we’re looking at representation or bias mitigation using these kinds of tools and seeing, like, oh, how many people of a certain gender are shown in television shows, or how can we mitigate bias against certain people of color, I think that is useful. I personally think that the best step forward is actually in policy and less about diversifying data. So I would like to see more discussion around how these systems should be used and what use cases should be regulated.Andrew:  OK, Morgan Klaus Scheurman, thank you so much.Morgan Klaus Scheurman:  Thank you so much for having me. Paul:  Thanks for joining us this week on Brainwaves. I’m Paul Beique. If you liked what you heard or have an idea for a topic we should cover, we want to know. You can now email us at [email protected] Executive Producer Andrew Sorensen and I produced this episode. Join us next week when the topic is music, from the Beatles to Gen Z. Dave from “2001: A Space Odyssey”:  Hello, HAL, do you read me? Hello, HAL, do you read me? Do you read me, HAL? Do you read me, HAL? Hello, HAL, do you read me? Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

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Women’s Equal Pay Day Meeting with Wine Women on April 4th…

By on June 13, 2021

first_imgTwitter ReddIt Email Share Linkedin Home Industry News Releases Women’s Equal Pay Day Meeting with Wine Women on April 4th at…Industry News ReleasesWine BusinessWomen’s Equal Pay Day Meeting with Wine Women on April 4th at Napa Valley CollegeBy Press Release – March 13, 2017 69 0 Facebook AdvertisementNapa, California | March 13, 2017: April 4, 2017, marks Women’s Equal Pay Day in the U.S., the day women finally earn the same amount men earned as of December 31, 2016. To celebrate, WINE WOMEN will hold a mini-expo, wine tasting and host keynote speakers at Napa Valley College Performing Arts Center. WINE WOMEN’s Spring Meeting will feature Cathy Corison and Jean Arnold Sessions discussing their careers in the wine business along with their insights on closing the gender pay gap, with moderator Geni Whitehouse. The event is open to the public and is ideal for those who champion equal pay and opportunities for women in the workplace.“Women still earn only $0.79 on the dollar in the U.S. While opportunities in the wine industry for women continue to expand, it is still estimated that it will take another five generations for women to achieve economic parity worldwide. With Cathy and Jean’s decades of experience in this industry, we thought they were the ideal women to impart sage advice to our members and guests on accelerating their careers in wine as our guest speakers,” explained WINE WOMEN president Christine L. Mueller. “We hope men and women alike will attend to pick up ideas on how to rev up their careers and close the gender pay gap in the wine industry.”ABOUT THE FEATURED SPEAKERSCathy CorisonCathy Corison, Winemaker/Owner, Corison Winery, St. Helena, has forged a life of wine that has spanned more than three decades, transcended formidable challenges and surpassed her wildest dreams. With many years of winemaking for others, including Chappellet Vineyard, Staglin Family Vineyard, York Creek Vineyards and Long Meadow Ranch, Cathy honed her skills which left her eager to express her own winemaking voice. In 1987 she made the first vintage of Corison Cabernet.Jean Arnold Sessions, Executive Director, Sonoma County Vintners, stepped into this role a year ago after retiring from Hanzell Vineyards where she had served as president for twelve years. She is also founder of the Jean Arnold Group, a strategic consulting firm, and creator of Women in the Business of Wine, a platform for mentoring women in wine, food and hospitality.Outside of her time at Sonoma County Vintners, she is focused on the leadership of Jean Arnold Group Collective and is the Founder of the Jean Arnold Group Foundation.Geni Whitehouse, CPA, CITP, CSPM, is a self-proclaimed nerd who has been heard around the globe on topics ranging from communication to finance to social media for introverts. An author, keynote speaker, and accounting industry influencer, Geni believes everyone has something interesting to say and is out to prove it. She spends half of her time working as the Countess of Communication at BDCoCPA.com and the rest of her time writing and speaking on financial and technology topics. A former tech company executive and CPA firm partner, she has been named one of the 25 Most Powerful Women in Accounting and an Industry Top 25 Thought Leader.ABOUT WINE WOMENWINE WOMEN’s mission is “To champion the advancement of women’s careers in the wine industry by building strong relationships, essential business skills and leadership among members.” At the core of the new 501(c)(3) nonprofit professional organization’s activities are programs focused on providing the tools, guidance and creativity for members to attain industry prominence.Early bird tickets for this April 4th event will be available to members and the public through March 20th. Group ticket discounts are also available. Tickets will be available through the beginning of April and range from $49 to $88 at: https://wine-women-spring-meeting.eventbrite.com/?aff=PRFor more information about WINE WOMEN, visit: http://winewomen.net/about/ or call 707.996.8740. Visit WINE WOMEN’s website at WineWomen.net, or their Facebook page, WineWomenOrg, or find them on Twitter @WineWomenOrg. For membership information, email Ellen Reich Luchtel, Membership Director, at [email protected] For complete details on their events calendar, visit: WineWomen.net/Events-List.Advertisement Pinterest TAGSCathy CorisonGeni WhitehouseJean Arnold SessionsWine Women Previous articleThe Family Coppola’s Virginia Dare Winery Announces Partnership with Renowned Creative and Design Team, Junk GypsyNext articlePlacing Your Brands with Big Distribution Is Like Dating a Supermodel Press Releaselast_img read more

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Top Workers and Entities to Receive Tourism Service Excellence Awards

By on June 12, 2021

first_imgRelatedTop Workers and Entities to Receive Tourism Service Excellence Awards FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Fifteen persons and 14 properties and organisations will vie for trophies, cash and other prizes at the prestigious Tourism Service Excellence awards, slated for Saturday, May 8 at Hilton Rose Hall Hotel in Montego Bay, St. James.From the finalists, six persons and six entities representing the island’s resort areas of Kingston, Port Antonio, Ocho Rios, Montego Bay, Negril and the South Coast, will be recognised and awarded for exceptional service in the tourism sector.Dubbed the ‘Oscar of Tourism’, the event will feature the ‘best of the best’ from across the island, in the hospitality sector.Speaking with JIS News, Executive Director at the Tourism Product Development Company (TPDCo), Earl Patrick explained that the awards are designed to “develop, maintain and enhance the very best men, women and organisations, serving their country through consistency in service excellence in the tourism industry”.“One of the most important components of the visitor experience is the quality of the interface between the visitor and the tourism worker and their experience with tourism services. Quality customer service delivery at every entity is integral to the continued growth in the tourism sector,” he stated.Outlining the various categories of awards and prizes, Mr. Patrick informed that each resort winner would be presented with the Resort Area Champion Trophy, in addition to cash prize and holiday weekends.The National Champion Individual will receive a trophy, cash prize of $175,000 and a one-week Caribbean cruise, with a trophy for the National Champion Organisation.The TSEP is an initiative of the Ministry of Tourism, TPDCo, and the Jamaica Tourist Board (JTB), and falls under the Ministry’s ‘Spruce Up Jamaica’ campaign.The major objectives of the TSEP are to recognise and reward individual workers, who have and continue to surpass customer service delivery standards and entities that continuously train and motivate staff to achieve excellence in customer service delivery; and to select, showcase and award the best in service excellence.The finalists representing the Negril region are: Dean Moriah, Breezes Grand Resort; Khadine Daley, Sandals Beach Resort; Tannecea Campbell, Couples Swept Away; and Ricardo Smith, Beaches Sandy Bay.From the Montego Bay region, the finalists are: Renford Patterson, Calypso Village Tryall Club; Jamaal Morrison, Chukka Caribbean Adventures; Andrea Kelly, The Ritz Carlton; and Margaret Edmondson, Chateau Margarite, while Mark Cole and Sonia Davis, Hedonism III; and Kemol Dixon, Sandals Grande are the finalists from Ocho Rios.From Kingston, the finalists are Ilia Gayle, Hilton Kingston Hotel; Venice Phillips, Norman Manley International Airport; and Dollis Campbell from Jam Venture Tours, while Andrea Swaby McLean from Jakes Treasure Beach, is the representative from the South Coast.The organisations are: Mystic Mountain, Beaches Boscobel, and Dolphin Cove, from the Ocho Rios region; Outameni Experience, Chukka Caribbean Adventures, and Half Moon Resort from Montego Bay; Spanish Court Hotel, Jamaica Pegasus and Canco Limited from Kingston; Beaches Sandy Bay, Negril Beach Resort, representing Negril; Mockingbird Hill Resort and Gee Jam, Port Antonio; and Jake’s from the South Coast. Top Workers and Entities to Receive Tourism Service Excellence Awards TourismMay 10, 2010 RelatedTop Workers and Entities to Receive Tourism Service Excellence Awardscenter_img RelatedTop Workers and Entities to Receive Tourism Service Excellence Awards Advertisementslast_img read more

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95 Students Receive Scholarships from Area 4 Police

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first_imgFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Story HighlightsNinety-five students, who attend Corporate Area high schools, have received scholarships totalling $1.4 million from the Area 4 Police Civic Committee Education Trust Fund of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF).The trust, which is supported through funding from Corporate Jamaica, provides scholarships to children in need, within the high risk age group of 12 to 18 years.The overall goal is to provide them with better educational opportunities, so as to prevent them from dropping out of school. Photo: JIS PhotographerCommissioner of Police, Dr. Carl Williams (right), makes presentation to Kevin Gordon (2nd right) of Donald Quarrie High School, at the scholarship award ceremony of the Area 4 Police Civic Committee Education Trust Fund, held on September 30 at the Police Officers’ Club, St. Andrew. Scholarship awardees Conrad Dallas of Kingston College; and Jahneil Clarke, of Immaculate Conception High School, look on. RelatedPolice Commissioner Pledges Accountability RelatedPortland Has Lowest Murder Rate Ninety-five students, who attend Corporate Area high schools, have received scholarships totalling $1.4 million from the Area 4 Police Civic Committee Education Trust Fund of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF).The trust, which is supported through funding from Corporate Jamaica, provides scholarships to children in need, within the high risk age group of 12 to 18 years, who reside in the five communities in Area 4.The overall goal is to provide them with better educational opportunities, so as to prevent them from dropping out of school.The children are chosen based on the guidelines established by the educational subcommittee of the Area 4 Police Civic Committee, after which an assessment is done and the final scholarship recipients are selected.Addressing the award ceremony held on September 30 at Police Officers Club at 34 Hope Road, Commissioner of Police, Dr. Carl Williams, encouraged the students to make good use of the opportunity afforded to them.“You will never get a better chance. At this early age, I want you to make the best use of this investment. I want you to go back to the society and be functional and productive citizens,” he implored them.Chairman of the Area 4 Police Civic Committee, Ferris Zaidie, also urged the students to do their best in school, as they are required to maintain a certain average to continue to receive the scholarship.Mr. Zaidie said he is pleased that some of the students are involved in the police youth clubs and “I want to encourage you to continue working closely with the police”.Fifth form scholarship recipient from Donald Quarrie High School, Kevin Gordon, expressed gratitude for the award, noting that it will go a far way.“I (often) have financial challenges for school, but I am constantly motivated by the television programme ‘Profile’ (which features Jamaicans, who have risen from modest circumstances to achieve success in various areas). I can relate to some of the challenges that the successful interviewees describe each week,” he said.Kevin encourages other students and their parents, who are facing difficulties, to “never give up, keep going at it and God will make a way.”The five divisions of Area 4 are: St. Andrew Central, St. Andrew South, Kingston Western, Kingston Central and Kingston Eastern.Since the inception of the scholarship programme in 2007, over 800 scholarships have been awarded with more than 300 students from over 40 high schools benefitting.center_img 95 Students Receive Scholarships from Area 4 PoliceJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay RelatedNew Police Commissioner to Improve Police-Citizen Relations 95 Students Receive Scholarships from Area 4 Police National SecurityOctober 3, 2014Written by: Shelly-Ann Irving Advertisementslast_img read more

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O2 throttles network after high EU roaming demand

By on June 4, 2021

first_img Related Telefonica, Liberty Global to finalise UK merger Español Previous ArticleChina smartphone shipments fall; Huawei reigns kingNext ArticleClaro, Movistar hit with $1.6B fine for contract breach O2 UK admitted to deliberately throttling data speeds across Europe, after customers began to use 4G services in the bloc following the abolishment of roaming charges last month.In comments made to The Register, a company spokesperson said the operator had put the temporary measure in place “to protect the service experience for customers roaming in the EU”, and cope with rising demand.O2 added that European mobile networks impose “traffic shaping and throttling measures” to protect services, and ensure that at least some bandwidth is available for everyone, “particularly when people stress a network with data usage”.The spokesperson said it was “working to have these controls removed within the coming weeks”.Roaming fees across Europe were abolished across EU-member countries on 15 June, after the policy was signed off in April. O2 UK said in May that its customers would be able to use their UK plans in 47 European countries (including some non-EU countries Iceland, Monaco and Switzerland) at no extra cost – from the same date as the fees were abolished.However, the company came under fire shortly after the move.The Register reported the issue first came to light after a customer complained on the company’s network support forum.Within a month of the abolishment of the charges, the customer said he was unable to use 4G services, achieving speeds of 0.5Mb/s in Dublin, Ireland.After carrying out tests on other networks, he concluded that O2 was the worst operator for data roaming.“I’m appalled that it’s throttled so badly and it’s shocking that 4G isn’t available,” he wrote.Virgin Mobile customers made a similar complaint about their roaming experience on the continent, added The Register. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 26 JUL 2017 Kavit joined Mobile World Live in May 2015 as Content Editor. He started his journalism career at the Press Association before joining Euromoney’s graduate scheme in April 2010. Read More >> Read more Home O2 throttles network after high EU roaming demandcenter_img El responsable de Virgin Media dirigirá la alianza de Telefónica en el Reino Unido Kavit Majithia Regulator clears Telefonica, Liberty Global UK megadeal Tags Author EUO2 UKRoaminglast_img read more

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Webb overcomes five-shot defecit to win Oz Open for fifth time

By on May 31, 2021

first_imgMELBOURNE, Australia – Karrie Webb won the Women’s Australian Open for the fifth time Sunday, shooting a 4-under 68 in the final round to beat Chella Choi by one stroke. Webb birdied the 18th hole to take the outright lead, then watched as Choi, who shot a course-record 62 on Saturday to take a share of the third-round lead, pushed a 10-foot putt wide of the hole at 18 to miss the chance for a playoff. Webb, who clinched her 40th LPGA title, finished at 12-under 276 overall. She previously won the Australian Open in 2000, 2002, 2007 and 2008. ”I got off to a great start and I just did a great job mentally today,” Webb said. ”I can’t think of another time when I held myself together as well as that.” The win marked a remarkable change of fortune for the No. 8-ranked Australian, who was disqualified from last week’s Australian Ladies Masters after signing an incorrect scorecard. She had been the defending champion at the event. Webb started five shots off the lead Sunday, but made six birdies and only two bogeys as the other leading challengers struggled in a strong wind on the Victoria Golf Club course. ”I was happy to see the conditions were going to be a little tougher today,” Webb said. ”I felt like that gave me a chance to make up some ground.” Choi had played 14 holes and was at 11 under when Webb finished her round, leaving the Australian with an anxious wait to see whether her score would hold up. But the South Korean, who had two eagles and six birdies in her record-setting third round, couldn’t make a birdie on the back nine Sunday. ”When you’re on the course you feel like you have some control, but when you’re done you have no control and you just have to wait and see,” Webb said. ”I actually thought once Chella had that putt on the last, I’ve played with her quite a bit and I was expecting that one to go in.” Choi was trying to win her first LPGA title. World No. 2 Suzann Pettersen of Norway faltered in her bid to take over the top ranking from South Korea’s Inbee Park. Pettersen, who started the day three shots off the pace in fourth place, needed to finish first or second to pass Park, but had three double bogeys in a final round 80 to drop back into a tie for 28th. Sixteen-year-old Lydia Ko of New Zealand, the world No. 4, was also unable to challenge Webb, struggling with her putt on the back nine and shooting a 73. She finished tied for third with American Paula Creamer (68) and Frenchwoman Karine Icher (71). Seventeen-year-old Australian amateur Minjee Lee, the co-overnight leader, had seven bogeys and a double bogey in an error-filled final round of 78. She finished in a share of 11th place.last_img read more

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