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Let’s ‘take back control’ of immigration – and increase it

By on September 4, 2021

Share Do we need the numbers of foreign workers to fall in order to honour the “will of the people” who voted for Brexit?The answer is no. Because it turns out that the psychology of immigration, and the sense of anxiety and discomfort voters feel about this hot-button issue, isn’t really linked to levels at all.If that sounds counter-intuitive, I’d invite you to look at Australia.Australia was held up as a bastion of sound immigration policy during the referendum campaign, with its “points-based system” heralded by Leave heavyweights such as Boris Johnson, Michael Gove, and even Nigel Farage.Countless Brexit voters responded in interviews and focus groups that they thought the Australian system, where migrants are granted work visas based on whether they have the skills that the economy needs, was intrinsically fair – far superior to having unelected EU officials across the Channel dictate which people the UK has to let in. In fact, when it comes to migration there seems to be a disconnect between what the two sides are actually talking about.On the one hand, you have Brexit voters, the vast majority of whom want an end to free movement – full stop – and do not appreciate the EU’s insistence that it is impossible to have free trade without it. For them, taking back control of our borders is a red line.On the other, businesses are panicking about the dearth of both skilled and unskilled labour that reducing immigration could cause.There are 2.4m EU citizens currently employed in the UK, and with unemployment at record lows, it is hard to see how those workers could be immediately replaced with Brits. With seven per cent of the UK labour force being EU nationals, it’s clear that demand for such people remains high.There have been various estimates of just how badly the economy would collapse if migration were drastically reduced, but before we go down the rabbit hole of doom scenarios, we should question the basic premise of the dichotomy. Friday 3 November 2017 4:24 pm by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeBras & Panties | Search AdsBrilliant Bras (look)Bras & Panties | Search AdsLotus CandlesCan your birthday candles do this?Lotus CandlesMartha Stewart CBDShop Martha Stewart’s CBD Products NowMartha Stewart CBDCNNStart Eating One Cucumber a Day, See What Happens to Your BodyCNNgeasbest2Top 18 Reasons Why Cats Follow Us to The Bathroomgeasbest2History DailyPhotographers Can’t Believe These Nature Photos Have Not Been EditedHistory DailyStyleVamp10+ Normal People Who Astonishingly Look Like CelebsStyleVampweniixTop 5 best sports cars 2021 – WENIIXweniixPlumber Near MeThe price card of a plumber in Arizona might surprise you. Discover Options!Plumber Near Me Let’s ‘take back control’ of immigration – and increase it But if you asked these voters how many immigrants Australia actually accepted, you probably wouldn’t have heard any answers close to the reality: Australia has three times the net migration per capita that the UK does. That is, there are three times as many foreign-born people to every native-born Australian Down Under as there are migrants to native-born Brits in the UK.And yet while the UK faces a political civil war over migration, Australians are decidedly relaxed. In a 2016 survey, only 34 per cent of Australians thought immigration should be reduced.Compare that to the 77 per cent of Brits thinking immigration was too high in pre-Referendum survey of the UK (which clearly included a lot of Remain voters), and you start to see the disconnect between migration levels and the cultural anxiety surrounding it.This doesn’t mean anyone who voted for Brexit because of concern over immigration was misguided. Wanting control over national borders is entirely valid – and not new.In 2006, the Labour government made a conscious decision to put up signs saying “UK border” at airports and dress immigration officials in police-like uniforms, to build the impression that the British border was secure and that the government was in control. Psychologically, that visible manifestation of authority went some way to inspiring confidence, even if it had no impact on the actual number of immigrants. In terms of British immigration policy post-Brexit, this implies that much of the panic around this issue may be misplaced. Once we end free movement, the UK government will be able to design a migration system tailor-built for Britain and its economic needs.All the evidence suggests we should keep the numbers the same or higher. The composition might change, with more migrants coming from countries that were previously heavily restricted in a bid to tackle numbers when reducing EU levels wasn’t an option – the US, Canada, India, China.The wage threshold on hiring foreign workers (currently £35,000) should be lowered to reflect some of the lower-paid skills desperately required in certain sectors – nurses and care workers for a start – and the government should heed the advice of industry bodies and make sure they have the skills they need.This isn’t politically unachievable. According to a British Futures survey from September, 66 per cent of Leave voters wanted the number of migrants working in care homes to remain the same or increase, and a majority felt similarly about other sectors.Even those most concerned about high immigration appreciate its benefits and relax once they know the policy is in the hands of a government that can be democratically voted out, rather than bureaucrats in Brussels.The UK government needs to inject an element of control into the migration system. At the same time, the economy needs immigration – as much and as diverse as is politically possible. But looking to Australia as a model, there is no reason we cannot have both. whatsapp Does “taking back control” of our borders mean reducing immigration?That’s a question that hasn’t been asked much over the last 16 months, even as Leavers and Remainers have locked horns over a host of other Brexit-related issues. whatsapp Rachel Cunliffe More From Our Partners Biden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgConnecticut man dies after crashing Harley into live bearnypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.com‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comPuffer fish snaps a selfie with lucky divernypost.comBill Gates reportedly hoped Jeffrey Epstein would help him win a Nobelnypost.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.com read more

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Seabirds recolonize Attu Island amid toxic WWII battlefield remnants

By on August 24, 2021

first_imgShare this story: Aleutians | Environment | History | WildlifeSeabirds recolonize Attu Island amid toxic WWII battlefield remnantsOctober 20, 2015 by Lauren Rosenthal, APRN Contributor Share:Personal from The US Fish and Wildlife Service research boat R/V Tiglax visit the World War II memorial constructed by the Japanese government honoring American and Japanese soldiers on Engineer Hill on Attu Island on Wednesday, June 3, 2015. (Photo by Bob Hallinen/Alaska Dispatch News)It’s been seven decades since U.S. soldiers recaptured Attu Island from Japanese forces, setting off one of the bloodiest battles of World War II.Once they recovered the most remote island in the Aleutian Chain, American forces transformed it, briefly, into a strategic hub. But that decades-old infrastructure has been crumbling under influence of harsh winds, weather and time.Now, Attu is scheduled for what may be the first of many stages of cleanup — but it’s unlikely the military will ever be able to turn back the clock to a time before conflict.Long before the war, Attu was home to a small village. It was also a haven for birds.“These common eiders, they just make this cooing — rrr, rrr. On a day like this, it carries across the water,” said Jeff Williams, assistant manager for the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, standing on the shore of Attu’s Casco Cove in early June. The sun shone brightly, with only the barest breeze pushing its way through tangles of beach grass.Attu has been a refuge for wildlife since 1913. President Theodore Roosevelt set it aside, along with a handful of other islands that were important to seabirds and marine mammals. But refuge status didn’t stop the military from using those lands during World War II.There are now more than 20 former defense sites located within the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. Attu is the most remote — nearly 1,500 air miles from Anchorage — and one of the most deeply affected. Besides collapsed Quonset huts and spent shells, the tundra is covered with rusting tank farms, decaying fuel barrels and miles of pipeline.This summer, Williams and a few volunteers for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service stopped to check on one of the worst areas — a field of above-ground storage tanks near an area called Navy Cove.“I mean, you can see the valve right there, just coming out,” Williams said, pointing to a viscous puddle of black liquid that had oozed from one tank. “It’s a direct source.”Biologist Jeff Williams checks the eggs in an Aleutian Canada goose nest on Attu Island. (Photo by Bob Hallinen/Alaska Dispatch News)The bodies of at least a half-dozen birds dotted the puddle; their decaying wings jutting out at odd angles — “almost like the La Brea tar pits.”“It’s not as thick — only a few inches thick. But it’s just enough,” Williams said. He gestured to-ward the edge of the puddle. “See a carcass right over here?”Over the years, investigators for the Fish and Wildlife Service have found the remains of many more birds trapped in this puddle. It’s the most obvious example of a much broader problem, as infrastructure built to support the Attu Naval Station and the Attu Army Air Base disintegrates.Both facilities closed in the years following World War II. The naval station came back into use in 1959 amid rising hostility between the United States and the Soviet Union. Within a decade, it had closed again, though, and the military returned all but a sliver of its 82,400-acre reservation to the wildlife refuge. (The remaining 1,800 acres were kept for the U.S. Coast Guard, which continuously maintained a navigational station on Attu until 2010.)Fish and Wildlife and federal contractors have conducted multiple site studies and reviewed as-built blueprints over the years, but they’ve never determined just how many gallons of petroleum products are still here. There have been some attempts to remove them: Williams said the Navy tried to decommission some of the fuel tanks they installed when the base finally shut down.“They burned a lot of them. There are pictures of guys with flamethrowers going right up to the tank. It’s really remarkable to see flamethrowers going on gunk like this, just igniting it and black flames flying up,” Williams said. “You know, I think we’ve changed some since then.”Abandoned tanks on Attu Island are inventoried as the US Fish and Wildlife Service research boat R/V Tiglax stops at the western most of the Aleutian Islands on Wednesday, June 3, 2015. (Photo by Bob Hallinen/Alaska Dispatch News)When the Army Corps of Engineers arrives on Attu in summer 2016, their operations will look much different. The agency has hired Bristol Environmental Remediation Services, LLC — a subsidiary of the Bristol Bay Native Corporation — to remove old storage containers and polluted soil from two sites, including the leaky tank farm.“We are also aware of a pallet-sized pile of old lead batteries,” said Army Corps project manager Andy Sorum. “And we’re going to target not only the remains of those batteries, but the contaminated soil around it.”The Army Corps received an extra burst of funding from Congress for this work. The price tag is $10 million; at least 40 percent of that covers a season’s worth of logistical expenses. “There’s nothing easy about getting heavy equipment to Attu and removing the volume of potentially contaminated material that we’re dealing with here,” Sorum said. He expects to deploy a mix of barges and aircraft, since Attu’s runways are still operable.Sorum also hopes to clean up other sections of the island down the road, working with federal site managers and the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation on details.But there are limits to what the Corps can do. Ken Andraschko oversees environmental restoration at old defense sites for the Army Corps of Engineers in Alaska. He said his teams will focus on chemical hazards; munitions and explosives expended during the war are beyond the scope of their program as outlined by Congress.“Anything that’s actually in a battlefield, anything that was released as part of the battlefield would be ineligible, because that’s defined as an Act of War,” Andraschko said. “And under our program, that is exclusively forbidden for us to go address.”A cormorant comes in for a landing near a rookery. (Photo by Bob Hallinen/Alaska Dispatch News)The battlefield was confined to the easternmost corner of Attu, but it casts a long shadow. American forces invaded by sea and slowly charged inland, through fog and frigid rains. Cut off from reinforcements, many Japanese soldiers decided it was more honorable to perish in battle — or by suicide — than to surrender. About 2,900 men are believed to have died over the course of 18 days.Now, the battlefield is a national landmark and part of a national monument to World War II in the Pacific Theater. “It’s not like your typical Civil War battlefield or your European battlefield where everything’s manicured,” said historian John Cloe. “These things are in a real wild state.”Cloe knows that firsthand. After retiring from a long career as a reservist and Air Force historian, Cloe is now a guide for a California-based company called Valor Tours. He’s been leading small groups of World War II buffs on sailing trips to Attu since 2013.When it comes to cleaning up the island, Cloe is strongly in favor. “Go to a Civil War battlefield — you don’t see a lot of junk lying around, do you?” he asked. “It’s unsightly, all this twisted metal lying around. It has very little historical relevance. Somebody needs to look at it and make sure, though.”It’s still being debated, but that twisted metal may stay put. The federal agencies responsible for managing Attu Island aren’t as concerned about debris, so long as it doesn’t leach chemicals or harm wildlife.A tufted puffin returns to its nest as the US Fish and Wildlife Service research boat R/V Tiglax stops at Attu Island the western most of the Aleutian Islands on Thursday, June 4, 2015. (Photo by Bob Hallinen/Alaska Dispatch News)The wreckage wasn’t enough to keep Aleutian cackling geese at bay. This summer, their high-pitched honks rang out from the shoreline all the way up to Attu’s mountain passes. The entire species was nearly extinct before the Fish and Wildlife Service launched a huge effort to bring the cackling goose back into its old nesting grounds on the refuge.“We didn’t bring these birds to Attu,” said Billy Pepper, captain of Fish and Wildlife’s research vessel. “All we did was remove the fox from here — and all of a sudden we come here one year and hear the [honking] just like you’re hearing right now. It’s like, wow. Now they’re everywhere. It just goes to show you what a little bit of work can do.”Pepper sailed to the island in June to drop off researchers who wanted to study the island’s birds. As they went about their work, the captain jumped on a four-wheeler and set off down old military roads with a few other Fish and Wildlife employees. They arrived at a small interpretive site the agency installed for the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Attu.There are a few signs explaining the significance of the Aleutian Campaign during World War II and the bravery shown by Army Private Joseph Martinez, who died leading an assault on a rocky hillside pocked with enemy foxholes.Pepper sat on a small bench looking out at Engineer Hill, where the final fight took place.“If you can try to let yourself run with the thought of what that would have been like for a 19-year-old kid, it’d be a lot,” Pepper said, shaking his head. “But they did it. And now it’s kind of gone full circle. It’s back to birds. A little interpretive site here, but it’s mostly birds.”last_img read more

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The lure of John McPhee’s “Coming into the Country,” 40 years later

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first_imgAlaska’s Energy DeskThe lure of John McPhee’s “Coming into the Country,” 40 years laterJanuary 23, 2017 by Jennifer Pemberton Share:“Coming into the Country,” John McPhee’s book about Alaska, was published in 1977, introducing readers across the country to a wild place, less than 20 years into its statehood. The book quickly became a best-seller and is still popular with tourists and Alaska residents alike.Audio Playerhttps://media.ktoo.org/2017/01/23LEGACY.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.John McPhee watches as Pat Pourchot patches their kayak so they could continue down the Salmon River. McPhee traveled to Alaska in the late 1970s for a series of articles that eventually became the book “Coming into the Country.” (Photo courtesy Pat Pourchot)Between 1975 and ‘77, a writer from Princeton, New Jersey, made four long trips to Alaska for a story that would eventually become “Coming into the Country.” John McPhee had been writing for the New Yorker magazine for about ten years. He was the master of a new literary genre that most modern readers are very familiar with: creative nonfiction.The book is written in three parts, every word published first in the pages of the New Yorker before coming together for the book’s publication late in 1977. The book describes an Alaska both wild and settled, sometimes contentiously so.“It is about what McPhee came to believe was the real Alaska and part of the reason for the book’s’ continued popularity is that many Alaskans also feel that that’s the real Alaska,” said Eric Heyne an English professor at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. He’s been teaching Coming into the Country since the late 1980s.The real Alaska described in the book is a place sparsely populated by trappers, prospectors and squatters, living very much off the land and off the grid in the area around the Yukon River.Heyne specializes in Alaskan literature, and so it makes sense to him that the profile of these characters is inherently relateable to so many Alaskans, then and now.“A lot of people still have an image in their heads of that Alaska being what they identify  with,” Heyne said, “Mining. Trapping. Dog mushing. Canoeing. Homesteading.”For Alaskans, Coming into the Country is familiar, but Alan Weltzein at the University of Western Montana says there’s also an exoticism to the book that appeals to readers outside the state .“A lot of people still in the 1970s didn’t know anything about Alaska,” Weltzein said. “Part of what McPhee’s trying to capture is its lure and there’s nothing more American than that. The lure is always to go west and find bigger space. I think Coming into the Country an invitation for some Americans — maybe just an imaginative invitation more than actual for most — probably to the relief of a lot of Alaskans.”Eric Heyne agrees that the book is alluring to outsiders as well as requisite reading for anyone already living in the state.“I absolutely recommend it as the first book to read if you’re coming to Alaska,” he said. “It remains the best blend of comprehensive, accurate, and well written. McPhee’s a fabulous writer.  There’s no question about that. But also it’s remained remarkably accurate to today’s Alaska.”The question of accuracy and relevancy comes up again and again when talking to people about Coming into the Country. For one, it was written 40 years ago. Hasn’t Alaska changed since then? Also, the guy who wrote it is from Princeton, New Jersey. How could Alaskans possible identify with that?“I distinctly remember feeling like I was having a love affair when I was reading Coming into the Country in the late 1970s,” said Alan Weltzein, who hadn’t even made it as far west as Montana when he read the book for the first time. “I had this kind of trust in his representation, so I could ride along with him when he defined what the country means if you live in Alaska.”John McPhee camping on a gravel bar below the Charley River. (Photo courtesy of Brad Snow & Lilly Allen Collection, Alaska and Polar Regions Collections, University of Alaska Fairbanks)It’s an old American tradition: the self-sufficient, independent individual. It’s a myth we’re all familiar with, but for as much as it reads like one, Coming into the Country isn’t a novel. The characters are real — many of them still living in Alaska, some of them still in cabins they built with their own hands.Cable television is littered with reality shows about modern-day Alaskans living in the bush, but Eric Heyne would rather go with McPhee’s portrayal from 40 years ago.“What you get in the reality shows these days are sort of cartoonish portraits of the kind of people who live off the road system, who have small mines, who run traplines,” he said. “What we get in McPhee’s book are deeper portraits of the actual people.”At the end of the book, on his last trip to Alaska, John McPhee talks to one of the young prospectors on the Yukon, confirming his understanding of what Alaska represents and what this lifestyle means.“In the society as a whole,” he writes “there is an elemental need for a frontier outlet, for a pioneer place to go. People are mentioning outer space as, in this respect, all we have left. All we have left is Alaska.”In some ways, all we have left is this book as a snapshot from 1977 of a vastly unknown but very real place.Share this story:last_img read more

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Pelican, Tenakee Springs get ferry sailings in revised Alaska Marine Highway schedule

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first_imgSoutheast | State Government | TransportationPelican, Tenakee Springs get ferry sailings in revised Alaska Marine Highway scheduleApril 26, 2020 by Ari Snider, KCAW – Sitka Share:The aging ferry dock in Tenakee Springs, pictured here in February 2020. The town will see the LeConte twice in June after its May sailings were canceled. (Photo by Ari Snider/KCAW)The Southeast Alaska community of Pelican will get monthly ferry service this summer after all.A revised Alaska Marine Highway System schedule released April 24 restores monthly sailings to the remote community on western Chichagof Island. And there’s some better news on the other side of the island as well: After having its May sailings canceled, Tenakee Springs will now see the ferry LeConte twice in June.Both towns were hit hard by the winter breakdown of the ferry system. Neither has had a sailing since October of last year, frustrating the towns’ mayors as well as many residents. Being left off the draft summer schedule entirely only added insult to injury. Business owners in particular were left scrambling for alternative options to move freight during the summer months.The Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities later revised the summer schedule, sending the LeConte to Pelican and Tenakee Springs in May, but those trips were recently canceled due to COVID-19 concerns.Instead, the LeConte will now sail once a month to Pelican from June through September, in addition to the two trips to Tenakee Springs in June.Share this story:last_img read more

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Opec’s decision not to cut production pulls down oil firms – London Report

By on July 13, 2021

first_imgThursday 27 November 2014 8:48 pm whatsapp Share Opec’s decision not to cut production pulls down oil firms – London Report THE FTSE closed mixed yesterday, with oil-sensitive blue chips heavy fallers after the Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries (Opec) said it would take no action to ease a global supply gut of oil.Their losses were almost offset by gains elsewhere.The FTSE 100 closed down 5.75 points, or 0.09 per cent, to 6723.42. FTSE 250 rose 101.23 points, or 0.64 per cent to 15,889.70.Tullow Oil led the oil pack lower, falling 7.21 per cent to 464.90p. It was followed by Petrofac, down 6.23 per cent to 843.50p.Among miners falling were Lonmin, which shed 3.54 per cent to 179.60p.But the prospect of lower fuel costs was boosting shares in airlines, with easyJet up 5.70 per cent at 1,633p and British Airways and Iberia owners International Consolidated Airlines Group climbing 4.81per cent to 457.80p. Tui Travel, up 3.78 per cent to 433.30p, led leisure stocks up. Admiral, up 2.63 per cent to 1,248p, captained the financials. Smith & Nephew was the leading pharma, rising 2.35 per cent to 1,133p. Tags: Oil prices Express KCS whatsapp More From Our Partners ‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.com‘The Love Boat’ captain Gavin MacLeod dies at 90nypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comKamala Harris keeps list of reporters who don’t ‘understand’ her: reportnypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.com Show Comments ▼last_img read more

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Legal & General exits Egypt in deal with Axa

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first_img Show Comments ▼ whatsapp UK INSURANCE and investments group Legal & General (L&G) has exited its Egypt business, Commercial International Life Insurance (CIL), selling it to Axa in a deal worth 763m Egyptian pounds (£62.9m).L&G are joint owners of CIL, holding 55 per cent of the company, while Commercial International Bank owned 45 per cent. The sale to Axa is expected to complete before the end of this year.Axa said the deal will allow it to accelerate its development in Egypt, following the granting of its preliminary non-life insurance licence in March 2015. The French insurance group plans to offer life, health and property & casualty insurance covers to individuals, SMEs and corporate clients in Egypt.Simon Burke, L&G’s managing director of emerging markets, said: “Legal & General’s strategy of building scalable, customer focussed, long-term businesses has been achieved in Egypt, and now is the right time to hand the business over.”Shares in L&G were up by 1.37 per cent yesterday. Express KCS Monday 13 July 2015 8:46 pm Read This Next’The View’: Meghan McCain Calls VP Kamala Harris a ‘Moron’ for BorderThe WrapRick Leventhal to Exit Fox News Just as His Wife Kelly Leaves ‘RealThe WrapTop 10 Fried Chicken Spots in the U.S.GayotRicky Schroder Calls Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl ‘Ignorant Punk’ forThe WrapNewsmax Rejected Matt Gaetz When Congressman ‘Reached Out’ for a JobThe WrapAdrian Grenier Agrees That Nate Is the ‘Real Villain’ in ‘The Devil WearsThe WrapDid Donald Trump Wear His Pants Backwards? Kriss Kross Memes Have AlreadyThe WrapJason Whitlock, Former ESPN and Fox Sports Reporter, Resurfaces at BlazeThe Wrap’In the Heights’ Stars Melissa Barrera and Leslie Grace on Nailing ThoseThe Wrapcenter_img Video Carousel – cityam_native_carousel – 426 00:00/00:50 LIVERead More Ad Unmute by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailUndoSwift VerdictChrissy Metz, 39, Shows Off Massive Weight Loss In Fierce New PhotoSwift VerdictUndoMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity WeekUndoPost FunKate & Meghan Are Very Different Mothers, These Photos Prove ItPost FunUndoComedyAbandoned Submarines Floating Around the WorldComedyUndoForbesThese 10 Colleges Have Produced The Most Billionaire AlumniForbesUndoGameday NewsNBA Wife Turns Heads Wherever She GoesGameday NewsUndozenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.comUndoEquity MirrorThey Drained Niagara Falls — They Weren’t Prepared For This Sickening DiscoveryEquity MirrorUndo Share whatsapp Legal & General exits Egypt in deal with Axa Tags: NULLlast_img read more

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News / Plea for Whitehall to hold faith in UK rail freight as report calls for upgrade delays

By on July 4, 2021

first_imgBy Gavin van Marle 30/11/2015 Rail freight campaigners in the UK have urged the government to remain committed to the mode after last week’s Hendy Report recommended that slated infrastructure projects be delayed.While the report by Sir Peter Hendy, commissioned by the UK’s Department for Transport to review rail infrastructure plans by provider Network Rail, confirms that planned freight schemes will continue, the timescale for completing the projects under the Strategic Freight Network fund has been extended by up to five years.This is a concern for rail freight advocates, who highlighted the upgrade of the Felixstowe branch line, with physical work not now scheduled to begin until 2019.Maggie Simpson, Rail Freight Group executive director, said: “Rail links are already running at capacity, yet one extra train a day to and from the port of Felixstowe could keep 30,000 lorries a year off the road.“We need urgent discussions with Network Rail and government to identify options for running more trains in the short term, and for ensuring the earliest possible delivery of key schemes.”As well as the Felixstowe enhancement, other projects under the SNF include an expansion of the Southampton to West Coast Main Line link, which would allow longer trains of up to 775 metres to run – increasing intermodal capacity of the UK’s northern ports; enhancing a level crossing at the Thames Gateway and improving Channel Tunnel rail capacity.However, the case for more pressing rail investment met with a stumbling block after the latest statistics from the Office of Rail and Road (ORR) were released last week, which showed that freight volumes carried on the rail system in the second quarter this year declined 18.1% year-on-year, largely as a result of falling coal volumes as the UK’s power network switches to fuel types with lower emissions.Ms Simpson added: “This has been a difficult year for rail freight, with coal traffic falling away and other sectors such as steel and international also beset by problems. Yet increases in construction traffic and continued good performance in intermodal shows that the sector is delivering well for its customers, and we should be confident of continued growth in these markets in future.”The ORR figures showed that the domestic intermodal segment – unitised freight traffic such as containers – remained the most important cargo type for rail operators, accounting for 37.1% of total freight moved, with 1.6bn net tonne km.last_img read more

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SEC freezes more funds in Nexen insider trading case

By on June 18, 2021

James Langton Related news ASIC ready to make deals with devils In the days following the acquisition announcement, the SEC filed an initial complaint in federal district court alleging that Hong Kong-based Well Advantage Ltd. and other unknown traders had traded Nexen stock based on nonpublic information about CNOOC’s impending acquisition of Nexen and reaped a total of more than US$13 million in illicit trading profits. Initially, it obtained a court order freezing assets valued at more than US$38 million. The SEC has since amended its complaint adding allegations that additional unknown traders also traded on the information. It is now also seeking an order that the traders to disgorge their ill-gotten gains with interest and pay financial penalties, and permanently barring them from future violations. None of the allegations in the case have been proven. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has frozen another US$6.5 million in assets of traders that it alleges were involved in illegal insider trading ahead of the recently announced acquisition of Canada’s Nexen Inc. The SEC announced that it has obtained an emergency court order in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York to freeze more than US$6 million in assets of additional unknown traders, who it says made approximately US$2.3 million in illegal profits by trading in advance of the announcement that China-based CNOOC Ltd. had agreed to acquire Nexen for approximately US$15.1 billion. SEC alleges man sold insider trading tips on dark web Keywords Insider tradingCompanies Securities and Exchange Commission Facebook LinkedIn Twitter FINRA bans analyst for insider trading read more

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Public Defender Says Police Killings can be reduced

By on June 17, 2021

first_imgFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Public Defender, Earl Witter, has said that police killings could be reduced, if members of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) had greater regard for the rules of engagement when attacked in the field.Mr. Witter was speaking Friday (January 29) at the annual award ceremony for top performers at the Bureau of Special Investigation (BSI), in downtown Kingston.Between July 1, 1999 and December 31, 2009, the BSI received 3,998 reports, involving 1,971 police killings. Two hundred and thirty one persons have been arrested in connection with some of these cases, with 92 being charged with murder.Mr. Witter said that nobody expects that any member of the force will lay down their lives in the service of their country, with capricious disregard for their safety and the interests of their family.“But it seems to me, there ought to be a more determined effort in executing the law, and in enforcing the law to have greater regard for the protection of the right to life, which the Constitution guarantees and which law enforcers, in particular, are required to secure,” he continued.The Public Defender said the number of killings was also placing additional pressures on his office, which investigates infringements on the rights of citizens by the state. He noted that in 2008 his office investigated 34 police killings, and 59 in 2009.However, Mr. Witter praised the work of the BSI in investigating cases of police shootings, describing the Bureau as the “Constabulary’s finest.”Director of Public Prosecution (DPP), Paula Llewellyn, congratulated the BSI for its commitment to law enforcement. In addition, Miss Llewellyn dismissed criticisms that members of the police force were not able to impartially investigate their colleagues.“I have been privileged to have prosecuted matters (in which) police officers are charged, matters which have been prepared by police officers, and those investigations have been first class. So, I like to use the age old tenet that I have been taught, that instead of making sweeping generalisations that some cynics like to make, I take each case on its own particular merits,” she explained.Friday’s function honoured the work of members of the BSI, with plaques and cash awards to the top performing groups and to the top individual performers.Detective Sergeant Derrick Campbell was named as the top performer, after producing 45 files for review by the DPP’s and the Commissioner’s offices. Public Defender Says Police Killings can be reduced National SecurityFebruary 5, 2010 RelatedPublic Defender Says Police Killings can be reduced Advertisementscenter_img RelatedPublic Defender Says Police Killings can be reduced RelatedPublic Defender Says Police Killings can be reducedlast_img read more

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Manhattan Moonshine

By on June 13, 2021

first_imgReddIt Linkedin TAGSManhattan MoonshineSpirits Consulting Group AdvertisementWhat’s old is new again. The un-aged white whiskey that established itself as the drink of choice during the roaring twenties has made an epic return in the form of “Manhattan Moonshine.”An ever-growing fascination with the era of jazz-fueled debauchery and Gatsby-rich style is what led entrepreneurial brothers William and James Kehler to develop a spirit that embodies the essence of the prohibition, the jazz age and Art Deco. Young consumers and baby-boomers alike are increasingly fascinated by the lives lived by the generations before us, as is evident by the flourishing return of the cocktail culture and speakeasy styled bars.A popular misconception is that all moonshine is cheaply made, harsh tasting, illegal liquor made in the backwoods of the Southern US in bathtubs, radiators or back woods make–shift stills. It is this misconception that gave birth to modern day “moonshines” packaged in mason jars or faux-jug-style bottles. In actuality, the majority of spirits that were produced during Prohibition were produced by sophisticated distilleries that operated in secret, and what they produced flowed into high-class speakeasies across the country. Now that Moonshine is being produced legally, Moonshine has come to refer to any un-aged Whiskey. As for taste and quality, Moonshine, like any other liquor, reflects the quality and craftsmanship that went into it.In the case of Manhattan Moonshine, the quality of craftsmanship is paramount. Whereas other moonshines are made by following traditional Aged-Whiskey or Bourbon recipes and excluding the final step of barrel aging, the recipe for Manhattan Moonshine was developed from the outset to create an Un-Aged Whiskey. The formula for Manhattan Moonshine was carefully created during a year of experimentation by Ian Smiley, the master distiller and author who literally wrote the book on Moonshine. The team worked with a unique grain bill including oats, rye and spelt as well as a unique yeast, and an innovative distillation process to create a truly great whiskey. Packaged in a sleek art deco styled decanter, Manhattan Moonshine is the first premium, un-aged whiskey that can compete with traditional whiskey offerings based on complexity and quality.The absence of color and the heavy flavors imparted by the barrel during the traditional ageing process, makes Manhattan Moonshine perfect for mixing cocktails; including many cocktails that traditionally call for Vodka or Gin. The cocktail program developed by James Moreland ranges from the classic but clear “White Manhattan” to the “Duke Negroni” to “Bessie Smash” so named for the late and great Bessie Smith also known as the Empress of the Blues and the most popular female Jazz singer in the 1920’s and 30’s.To develop the strategy and manage the logistics of the launch, William and James have been working closely with liquor industry expert, Susan Mooney, and her team at the Spirits Consulting Group. “William and James came to us with a truly innovative idea to develop their premium un-aged Whiskey,” said Mooney. “we believe that there is a need in the market for its unique properties, visual appeal and crisp, complex flavor profile.” Manhattan Moonshine will be the perfect spirit choice for non-Whiskey drinkers as well as connoisseurs. SCG worked with the Kehler brothers to find the perfect production partners, develop budgets for their brand launch and to create a winning launch strategy. “We are looking forward to working with the Kehler brothers on the launch of this exciting product”, said Mooney.Manhattan Moonshine will launch both on and off premise in New York this Fall, in the unmistakable 750 ml art deco decanter, at an ARP of $45. Manhattan-Moonshine will also be available for purchase online at: www.Manhattan-Moonshine.com.ABOUT MANHATTAN MOONSHINEManhattan Moonshine Company, LLC was established in 2013 by William and James Kehler to create the greatest un-aged Whiskey ever made and to establish un-aged Whiskey as a legitimate expression of Whiskey that is  competitive with aged Whiskey in flavor, quality, and class. Will and James are New York City natives who are both fascinated by the Prohibition era, art deco and jazz. The brothers worked for over a year with whiskey expert, Ian Smiley to create a unique formulation and with SCG spirits industry experts to create the brand and launch the product. Manhattan Moonshine will be introduced to the New York Market in the Fall of 2014. www.manhattan-moonshine.comABOUT SPIRITS CONSULTING GROUPSpirits Consulting group is a team of industry professionals who specialize in planning, developing and launching innovative wine and spirit brands. Led by CEO Susan Mooney, SCG team has assisted both existing and new brands launch or expand in the U.S. market. Spirits Consulting Group is based in New York. www.spiritsconsulting.comAdvertisement Facebook Previous articleOregon Wine Services Merges with WineshippingNext articleWine Industry on the Road to Recovery in the Wake of the Napa Earthquake Press Release Pinterest Share Home Industry News Releases Manhattan MoonshineIndustry News ReleasesSpirits BusinessManhattan MoonshineBy Press Release – September 26, 2014 72 0 Email Twitterlast_img read more

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