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McInnes unhappy Rangers speculation ‘has dragged on’

By on December 24, 2019

first_imgThe manager made it clear that he wasn’t happy with the situation surrounding him and the constant links with a move.“I made my position clear a few weeks ago and this has been ongoing,” he said. “It just feels as if it has dragged on and on.“I’m not happy with how things have played out.“I know [the Press] have a job to do and must be getting fed some sort of stuff, so there has been plenty of encouragement to run stories. “Everybody seems to be in the know and every other day there is someone giving an opinion on my future and what Rangers are doing.“It’s not been as straightforward as it should have been the last few weeks.”Pressed on whether he remained fully committed to remaining at Aberdeen, he said: “It’s wrong for me to make a comment on speculation or assumption.“I’m manager of Aberdeen and my job is to get a winning team on the pitch.” Aberdeen boss Derek McInnes has said he’s unhappy that speculation about a move to become Rangers’ new manager “has dragged on and on”.McInnes spoke after seeing his side fall to a 2-1 loss against Rangers at Pittodrie.Danny Wilson gave the visitors a first-half lead with a header before Ryan Jack was shown a red card in the second half for a tackle on Stevie May. Josh Windass doubled Rangers’ lead before a Frank Ross free-kick put Aberdeen back in the game, though they were unable to find an equaliser.The defeat came following a 3-0 loss to the same opposition at Ibrox on Wednesday and with constant speculation that Rangers are looking to appoint McInnes as the successor to Pedro Caixinha.last_img read more

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Marshfield, Colby girls are regional champions: Columbus boys enter post season

By on December 20, 2019

first_imgMarshfield’s Jenna Jakobi attempts a jumper in the Tigers’ Division II Regional Final win over New London Feb. 24 at the MHS Fieldhouse. Connor Hughes photoBy Hub City Times staffMARSHFIELD – The Marshfield Tigers girls basketball team is Division II regional champions, after defeating New London, 37-29, in a D-II regional final Feb. 24 at the Marshfield High School Fieldhouse.Corianne Johnson led the Tigers with 10.No. 3 Marshfield play No. 1 Hortonville in a Division II sectional semifinal March 1 at Antigo High School. The Tigers advanced to the regional final by defeating Shawano Feb. 23, 60-52.The Colby girls are Division IV regional champions after defeating Neillsville Feb. 24 at Colby High School, 40-33.The Hornets were led by Alyssa Underwood with 13.No. 2 Colby faces No. 1 Marathon in a Division IV sectional semifinal March 1 at D.C. Everest High School.The Columbus Dons girls basketball team lost its Division V regional semifinal at Bowler Feb. 23, 54-49. Bowler held on to win despite a late comeback by the Dons in the game.The Loyal Greyhounds lost their Division V regional semifinal in the opposite bracket, losing to No. 1 Tri-County, 60-51.The Columbus Dons boys basketball team won the first-place Cloverbelt Conference crossover game Feb. 24 at Osseo, beating the Osseo-Fairchild Thunder 72-60.The Dons were led by Ethan Meece with 22. Jarred Mandel had 20, and Nick Malovrh added 18. Logan Mulhern led the Thunder with 23.Columbus met No. 16 Tigerton on Feb. 27 for post-season play, in a Division V regional quarter-final at Columbus Catholic High School.last_img read more

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Inner city kids learn about film

By on December 18, 2019

first_imgFilm + School is a film awareness and appreciation initiative run by The Bioscope Independent Cinema and the Goethe-Institut South Africa to introduce youngsters to the art of filmmaking. (Image: The Bioscope) MEDIA CONTACTS • Russell Grant   Co-owner, The Bioscope  +27 11 039 7306 RELATED ARTICLES • Education at the movies • A winning open education system • A taste of the film club experience • Macufe film week returnsTiisetso TlelimaPonte City is still the tallest residential building in Africa, a position it’s occupied since 1975. The unusual round, hollow-centre block of flats in Berea, in Joburg’s inner city, is home to 4 000 people, many of them migrants from across the continent.Their perspectives on how they are viewed in post-apartheid South Africa are explored in a poignant documentary, Africa Shafted: Under One Roof, which begins this year’s Bioscope Film + School cinema education series for inner city schoolchildren. The programme begins on February 6.Now in its third year, Film + School is a film awareness and appreciation initiative run by The Bioscope Independent Cinema and the Goethe-Institut South Africa to introduce youngsters to the art of filmmaking. The programme targets primary and secondary schoolchildren from under-resourced schools in the inner city such as Mahlasedi High School, New Model Private College and Metropolitan College.It has been designed to be as broad as possible to give the children an opportunity to engage in a wide range of film genres and structures, including fiction, documentary and animated film. This allows them to become familiar with the different modes of storytelling of the medium.“In the past, we looked at all the different kinds of animation and then we tried to make it interactive by bringing industry experts to talk to the kids,” explained The Bioscope co-owner, Russell Grant.“We had a guy who did a demonstration on animation and explained to the kids exactly how it works. How you take one photo and you move an object. Then you take another photo, and when you put the photos together you can see the object move.”Using the film as a starting point, the screenings involve discussions with the children. These are intended to encourage them to interrogate the subject matter of the film and the way in which it has been made. Discussions are on a wide variety of topics, including HIV and Aids, race, sexuality, gender, and migration. They are facilitated by Puleng Plessie, who approaches the schools and manages the relationship between the project and the schools.This year’s programme, which runs from February 6 to March 20, will introduce the children to the world of documentary filmmaking through five South African documentaries: Africa Shafted: Under One Roof (2011), Cradock Four (2011), Taking Back The Waves (2005), The Creators (2011) and Afrikaaps (2010). The topics they cover range from exploring life in the inner city and a history of the struggle against apartheid, to surf culture and an exploration of South African youth culture.Each screening is to a full house, with about 62 children attending each session. The screenings take place every Wednesday at 11am. “We are looking to do a season for every school term. Since we started in February 2011, the seasons have run across a few months,” said Grant.Making their own filmsIn 2011, the Bioscope worked with Nigerian filmmaker Akin Omotoso to make a film together with the children on migration. “We got them to [each] bring an object which they felt represented their belonging in any shape or form,” he explained.They were filmed presenting their objects to the rest of the class. These presentations were then cut into a film, which was later shown to the children. “They loved it because they got to be a part of a filmmaking process, which was fun … The film never had a formal name, other than The Belonging Film. We hoped to have them learn about what it means to belong to something as well as how one prepares and acts in front of a camera.”In November last year, The Bioscope and the French Season South Africa ran a project called the Home Movie Factory. It allowed members of the public, including the Film + School students, to make their own movies. Conceptualised by French filmmaker Michel Gondry, the Home Movie Factory was a collection of 12 film sets that each reflected an aspect of Joburg life, ranging from a downtown street to a Highveld campsite to a mine-shaft.Participants drove cars that didn’t move; flipped switches to change the time of day and played with other interactive elements to tell their stories. The idea was that any member of the public, for free and for fun, could come into the factory and make his or her own movie.“So there’s a range of sets and props and you make a movie. So the kids came and made their own films,” said Grant. “We wanted everyone to take part and it was very important that the same inner city school kids also made use of the Home Movie Factory.”The films made at the Home Movie Factory were not necessarily for the public, but the children themselves left with a copy of the movie they had made, he added.last_img read more

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Move Your Microsoft Server Licenses to Amazon’s Cloud

By on December 16, 2019

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts david stromcenter_img Amazon announced a major coup with pricing for Windows Servers on AWS today. Now you can move your licenses from a physical machine to AWS’ cloud, including all Microsoft server apps, such as server versions of Exchange, SharePoint, SQL Server and Dynamics CRM.You can either purchase a new license or migrate your existing licenses through the recently expanded Microsoft Software Assurance program, which earlier this month enabled moving your licenses from a physical server to the cloud. What AWS has done is make this easier, without having to pay for a second license for the cloud-based instance. It is about time that Microsoft has done this, and given the pace of virtualization, a good thing, too.Amazon made the announcement today at the Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference in Los Angeles. “If you are an ISV and have migration tools that will help customers migrate their existing deployments, now you can extend your offerings to AWS cloud. If you are a System Integrator offering professional services to customers and specialize in above Microsoft Windows Server applications, we would love to hear from you,” the company posted on the AWS blog. Amazon is seeing customers who want to migrate from an earlier, say Server 2003, version to more current versions in the cloud. More information can be found on Amazon’s web site here. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#Announcements#cloud#Cloud Providers last_img read more

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Tailgating won’t get you through that intersection any faster

By on December 1, 2019

first_img Tailgating won’t get you through that intersection any faster By Lakshmi SupriyaDec. 1, 2017 , 12:00 PM You’ve stopped barely a hair’s breadth away from the car in front of you at a traffic light, hoping to get through quickly when the light changes. But you won’t. Instead, a new study suggests you’ll take just as long as an auto stopped up to two car lengths behind the lead driver. To find out whether tailgating pays off, researchers lined up 10 sedans at a traffic intersection on a test road, such that they stood different distances apart each time. A drone hovering above the intersection recorded the cars moving as the light turned green. Just as it takes time to heat a solid ice cube before it starts melting—a thermodynamic concept called latent heat—there’s a time lag before you can safely accelerate your car in a solid jam, offsetting any advantage of closeness, researchers reported last week in the New Journal of Physics. A car standing up to 7.6 meters back speeds up and covers the extra distance in about the same time it takes the tailgating car, with both crossing the intersection at the same time. That suggests your driver’s education teacher was right all along: Maintaining a safe distance at traffic lights won’t slow you down, and it has the added benefit of reducing your chances of rear-end collisions. But think again if you’re waiting in a line full of people. Because pedestrians are slower, the time delay becomes insignificant, making a closer-packed line move quicker.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)center_img David Santiago Garcia/Aurora Photos last_img read more

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