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Promotion of Kvarner on the Italian market

By on November 20, 2020

first_imgThe Kvarner Tourist Board, after a series of extremely successful promotional activities in the main European emitting markets, continues to promote Kvarner on the Italian market. This time the emphasis is on the top eno and gastronomic offer of the Kvarner region, through the branding project – Kvarner Gourmet & Food, as an unavoidable gastro destination.Thus, thanks to the Kvarner Tourist Board, the popular television team of the Mediaset group – Rete4 channels – stayed in our region to realize a special edition of the show “Ricette all’Italiana” – Ricette Croate (Croatian recipes).The show “Ricette all’Italiana” explores and shows recipes of Italian cuisine, as well as destinations and other attractions of Italy.Once a year, the TV crew visits the surrounding countries and presents their gastronomy and tourist offer. In 2015, they chose Malta as their destination, and this year the honor went to Croatia, ie the Kvarner and Istrian regions, well known to the Italian market as favorite destinations for top gastronomic delights.The main coordinator of the program in the Kvarner area was the Kvarner Tourist Board, in cooperation with local tourist boards and businesses.The team of the television “Rete 4” collected materials for the realization of a total of 6 shows dedicated to the promotion of Croatia. In 3 shows, only the Kvarner region and a diverse offer of cultural, natural and historical heritage, art, active, health tourism… and of course, the inevitable and unique eno-gastronomic offer… In the other 3 shows, Istria will be promoted.The show “Ricette all’Italiana” is famous and loved by Italian viewers due to widely known and versatile hosts such as Davide Mengacci and Michelo Coppa, and is broadcast from Monday to Saturday from 10.50 to 11.30 on the program Mediaset Retequattro. The show can also be watched internationally through the portal www.video.mediaset.it or the section “Ricette all’Italiana”.With the constant assistance of the Kvarner Tourist Board, the TV crew got to know the diversity of the Kvarner tourist offer. Thus, the recording of recipes and cooking show followed in Kastav, which caused great interest not only from the local population and audience, but also foreign guests who stayed in Kastav, and through the recorded contributions were presented Opatija, Rijeka, the island of Krk – Vrbnik , Risnjak National Park, and Fužine. In this way, the Rete4 team was able to enjoy and see for themselves the diversity of the offer of the coast, islands and mountains, as well as the diversity of the gastronomic offer.”We hope that this is just the beginning of a successful, long-term cooperation with Italian television and a very important broadcasting market for us, and that we will have opportunities in further promotional activities to show all the beauties and diversity offered by the Kvarner region. We want to not only maintain the existing positive trend of the Italian market but also significantly increase it ” – said the director of the Kvarner Tourist Board, Ph.D. Irena Persic Zivadinov.The first broadcast was on Monday, May 2, followed by the shows that are scheduled for Wednesday, May 4 and Friday, May 6, beginning at 10.50:30 p.m. Reruns are expected at the end of the summer season. The show, lasting 40 to 250.000 minutes, is watched daily by over 35 viewers in the average age group of 65 to XNUMX, and, given the reach of viewers, will certainly have a significant promotional effect.In addition, the shows will be shown in the period before and after the season, which will certainly help guests from Italy to choose the Kvarner region for their vacation.last_img read more

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15 years of the Rab Fair

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first_imgThis year from The jubilee 25th Rab Fair is held from 27 to 15 July, the first and largest medieval festival that every year the town of Rab takes back to the past dating back to pre-Roman times.Rab Fair brings a breath of the past and celebrates freedom, every street takes on a breath of atmosphere – celebration, happiness, good vibes, while every place on the island has its own flag, which colors the center of Rab as it prepares to dive into the past. This tradition began in 1364, when the first Summer Festival or fair was held as a celebration of the liberation from Venice, in honor of Louis the Great, who declared Rab a free municipality. That day is also dedicated to St. Christopher, the patron saint of the town of Rab.Undoubtedly one of the most attractive summer events in Croatia, the city of Rab turns into a big stage that hosts a three-day event of reviving medieval history and customs. This tradition is still maintained today, and the celebration is joined by many local artisans who show there the diversity of local products. The tradition of knightly games has also been revived, so you can see the competition of Rab crossbowmen, costumes from the Middle Ages and taste delicacies that are prepared according to the original recipe from the 14th century. The whole city turns into a big stage and a folk celebration where you can see traditional, artistic and craft works.The whole festival gets its finale on the third day of the fair, on July 27, with the inevitable knights’ tournament. The ceremonial parade and archery competition of the Rab knights will surely delight everyone present. The smell of freshly fried snails spreads through the air, while the entire fishing village, built entirely with traditional tools, springs up on the beach, even toys for children. The streets resound with song and music as passers-by are offered tuna, fritters, cheese and wine.In the end, we can say only one thing – a phenomenal tourist story in which the whole city really turns into a medieval city and with a stage spectacle offers local and indigenous products packed into a great story.last_img read more

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Booking.com reveals that most travelers from Croatia remember the first trip more than the day they made a new friend

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first_imgIstraživanje koje je proveo Booking.com, otkriva puno interesantnih činjenica o iskustvima putnika iz Hrvatske na njihovim prvim putovanjima. Bilo da putuju po prvi puta u životu ili na neku novu, nikad posjećenu destinaciju, ili da putuju na drugačiji način od uobičajenog ili odsjedaju u neobičnom smještaju – svi se sjećaju svojeg prvog putovanja.Booking.com conducted a survey in which it found answers to questions about when travelers from Croatia first went on a trip, what they remember most about those first trips, who they like to travel with and what they recommend to those who are just starting to travel.Survey on a sample of 1.000 respondents from the USA, Brazil, UK, France, Italy, Spain, Russia, Germany, China, India and 500 respondents from the Netherlands, Croatia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, Australia, Thailand , Denmark, Belgium and Sweden. Answers were collected from a total of 15.077 respondents (aged 18 or over) for the period from 11 January to 30 January 2017.The largest percentage of respondents (40%) started traveling when they were less than 10 years old, most had their first experience with travel in adolescence (42%), and only 1% of respondents experienced the first trip only after the age of 30. of life. As many as 70% of respondents from Croatia spent their first trip within their homeland. The largest percentage of respondents stated that they are happiest when traveling with a partner (45%) or with family (42%), but there were also those respondents who like to travel alone because then they feel free (26%). A quarter of respondents (25%) prefer to travel to locations they have already visited, and the majority (80%) of respondents want to discover new and interesting things about locations they have already visited.58% of respondents remember their first trip more clearly and better than the first day of schoolThe results of the research show that respondents from Croatia remember their first trip more than they remember events such as the day they met a new friend (66%) or when they got their first pet (55%). Despite this, most respondents find moving to a new home (72%) and a first kiss (75%) more exciting than the experience of the first trip. Things that remind respondents of the trip and be fond memories are photo albums (76%), souvenirs (67%) and plans of the city they visited (17%).Regarding the most beautiful and long-lasting experiences that travelers from Croatia had on their first trips, spending quality time with friends or family (51%), just traveling (51%), accommodation (40%), unusual scents, sounds and vistas (39 %) and meeting new people (34%) are what make a travel experience perfect. Respondents value the time they spend with those they care about because 48% of them claim that it is one of their favorite things they experience while traveling.Kayakers paddle the Silver River at Silver Springs, Florida.Social online platforms have allowed travelers to easily communicate about their trip. Recenzije o uslugama ili interakcija s putničkim brendovima, dijeljenje fotografija i iskustava s putovanja s prijateljima i mnoge druge stvari ono su što planiranje putovanja i samo putovanje čini drugačijim nego prije. Ispitanici iz Hrvatske, za razliku od prosjeka, koristit će društvene mreže kako bi unaprijed istražili sve detalje vezane uz putovanje (50% naspram prosjeka ostatka ispitanika globalnog istraživanja – 40%). Korištenje društvenih mreža prilikom planiranja putovanja najviše se prakticira u Tajlandu (75%), a najmanje u Nizozemskoj i Danskoj (17%).Savjeti koje putnici iz Hrvatske daju onima koji prvi puta kreću na putovanje su opuštanje i uživanje u svakoj minuti (51%), isprobavanje lokalne hrane (31%) te obavezno nošenje putovnice sa sobom (28%). Kako bi se osjećali ugodno i sigurno prilikom putovanja ispitanici iz Hrvatske savjetuju  organiziranje smještaja prije samog putovanja (21%) kao i pregled broja pozitivnih ocjena smještaja ili prijevoznika na online platformama (30%) te unajmljivanje lokalnog turističkog vodiča na odredištu (21%).last_img read more

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Study finds couples produce less of the stress hormone cortisol than singles do

By on November 19, 2020

first_imgFalling in love is one of the essential human experiences. It has been romanticized for centuries, and is essential for human survival, but little is known about the scientific process behind it.In a new study, researchers evaluated the psychological process and examined the physiological response to falling in love.The early stage of romantic love is usually associated with “intense preoccupations and worries regarding the partner and the relationship, obsessive-like anticipation, focus on minute non-verbal signals, and fears of rejection,” the researchers from Bar-Ilan University noted. However, romantic relationships also require “sufficient calm” in order to create a trusting approach with one’s partner, which is known as “immobility without fear.” Share Share on Twitter Email LinkedIncenter_img Share on Facebook Pinterest Specifically, cortisol, a steroid hormone excreted usually in response to stress, has been related to “psychological, physiological, and physical health.” Cortisol levels are associated with behavior between romantic partners; partners with higher levels of cortisol have demonstrated greater animosity during conflict interactions.Researchers in this study published in Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology argue that reduced cortisol production is necessary for this state of “immobility with fear,” which is crucial to the beginning of a romantic relationship.To test this, researchers “measured associations between daily cortisol and CAR and the couple’s observed social reciprocity and joint partnership during naturalistic interactions.” Using this theory of cortisol, researchers utilized one hundred and 55 young adults which were split into two groups — a new couples group, who began their relationships on average 2.4 months prior to the study, and a singles group, which included 35 young adults who were not in any romantic relationship and had not been so for at least 3 months prior to the study. The singles group was comprised of 21 women and 14 men. The participants collected saliva when they woke up, half an hour after waking up, and just before bedtime on two consecutive weekdays.Couples also were asked to “arrive at the lab for a videotaped interaction that included two paradigms; positive and support giving.” In the positive interaction, couples discussed a shared positive experience; the support giving interaction had couples describe to each other situations that had caused them stress but weren’t related to the relationship.Researchers found that couples in relationships produced less cortisol than individuals not in relationships, like they had predicted. Romantic partners who displayed “greater social reciprocity and goal-directed partnership, including the expression of positive affect, matched dyadic states, visual attention to partner, consistent and predictable style, and focus on listening to the partner and jointly accomplishing the task at hand” during the interaction sessions at the lab were also shown to have lower cortisol production than those couples who did not.One important limitation in the study was that the singles group was comprised of mostly women; the results could show some gender bias. Also, the amount of time couples spent together during the study was not measured or regulated. Researchers noted that further research is necessary to study the lack of a stress response when falling in love.last_img read more

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When it comes to mental health, parents shouldn’t worry who their children are friends with

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first_imgEmail LinkedIn Share on Twitter Pinterest When you’re a teenager, what your friends say and do really matter. Even for the most nonconformist adolescents, the clothes you wear, the music you listen to, whether or not you drink or take drugs, and even your attitudes and opinions about the world are often hugely influenced by your peers.But does this effect extend to your mental health? Social factors such as living alone or experiencing abuse in childhood play a large role in whether someone becomes depressed. On the other side, social support (having people to talk to) is important for recovery from depression. So can the social impact of being friends with people who are depressed drag you down as well? And does having a positive mood keep those around you in high spirits?To answer these questions, my colleagues and I studied data on more than 2,000 adolescents in a network of US high school students to see how their mood influenced each other. This involved modelling the spread of mood using similar methods to those used to track the spread of infectious diseases.center_img Share Share on Facebook The difficulty with this method was the existence of examples that indicate something has spread when in reality it hasn’t (a false positive). In this case, a possible cause of false positives is the tendency for people to have friends who are like themselves. For example, if a group of friends all drink large amounts of alcohol and several become depressed it may be the alcohol rather than the friendships that cause the depression.To deal with this issue, our analysis used longitudinal data (information recorded repeatedly over time). This allowed us to directly model changes in mood by noting each individual’s depression at one time point and whether or not this has changed at a second time point. This meant it did not matter what the other characteristics of the people were.We found that depression does not “spread” between friends. But, on the other hand, having five or more friends with a healthy mood can halve the probability of developing depression over a six-to-12 month period. And having ten healthy-mood friends doubles the probability of recovering from depression compared to those who have just three such friends.“Spreading” moodsIt’s important to note that we don’t believe a healthy mood literally “spreads” like a disease but rather that it emerges from the behaviour of a complex social system. This behaviour is possible through a number of mechanisms. Research has shown people who are, or tend to be, depressed are less able to maintain a positive outlook from moment to moment. For these individuals, having sufficient exposure and interaction with healthy friends could address this issue. This can keep their own mood healthy or aid their recovery.Additionally, depression has been associated with social withdrawal, meaning that depressed individuals would be expected to exert less social influence than adolescents exhibiting a healthy mood. This offers a possible explanation for why we found that depression didn’t spread.These findings show that when it comes to mental health, parents shouldn’t be worried about who their teenagers are friends with. Having depressed friends does not put them at risk, but having healthy friends is both protective and curative. What’s more, the research supports the idea that depression should be a public health issue rather than an individual one and should be used to help counter the stigma attached to the condition.It also suggests that one cheap, low-risk way to tackle depression among young people would be to simply encourage friendships, for example by providing youth clubs. If every teenager had more friends it could go some way to providing them with a protective effect against mental health problems.By Edward Hill, University of WarwickEdward Hill is PhD candidate in mathematical epidemiology & complexity science at University of WarwickThis article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.last_img read more

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New mechanism discovered behind infant epilepsy

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first_imgShare Email Pinterest Scientists at Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital in Sweden have discovered a new explanation for severe early infant epilepsy. Mutations in the gene encoding the protein KCC2 can cause the disease, hereby confirming an earlier theory. The findings are being published in the journal Nature Communications.Through large-scale genetic analyses of a family with two affected children at SciLifeLab in Stockholm, mutations were identified in the gene encoding the transport protein KCC2. In a collaboration with scientists at the University College London, another family with children carrying mutations in the same gene was further identified. Two of the children in each family demonstrated similar symptoms that can be connected to a severe variant of infant epilepsy with MPSI (Migrating Partial Seizures of Infancy).“Epilepsy occurs in many different forms. Earlier associations with KCC2 have been observed, such as a down-regulation of the protein after brain damage that increases the tendency for seizures, but firm evidence for this disease mechanism has been lacking so far”, says Anna Wedell, senior physician at Karolinska University Hospital and professor at the Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery at Karolinska Institutet. “Through our discovery we have been able to prove that a defective function of the KCC2 protein causes epilepsy and hence that an imbalance in the brain’s chloride ion regulation system can be the reason behind the disease. The next step is to investigate to which extent this imbalance occurs in more common variants of epilepsy.” Share on Twittercenter_img LinkedIn Share on Facebook KCC2 constitutes a chloride channel specifically localized in the brain and have earlier been shown to play a major role in synaptic inhibition by maintaining a low concentration of chloride ions inside the neurons. Normally the amount of KCC2 increases shortly after birth, causing the signal substance GABA to switch from being stimulating to being inhibitory.“Mutations in the gene encoding KCC2 prevent this switch which makes GABA remain stimulatory, incapable of inhibiting the signals of the brain”, says Dr. Wedell. “The neurons then discharge at times, when they normally should not, giving rise to epilepsy.”By conducting detailed investigations of cells expressing both the normal and the mutated forms of KCC2, the scientists demonstrated that the identified mutations led to disrupted chloride ion regulation and that an imbalance in this system thus brings about severe infant epilepsy, a potentially treatable disease.“Clinical trials are ongoing with a drug that, if successful, will compensate for the disrupted regulation and ameliorate the disease in small children with epilepsy, says Dr. Wedell.”last_img read more

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Yoga improves mental wellbeing among people with arthritis

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first_imgShare LinkedIn Share on Facebook A randomized trial of people with two common forms of arthritis has found that yoga can be safe and effective for people with arthritis. Johns Hopkins researchers report that 8 weeks of yoga classes improved the physical and mental wellbeing of people with two common forms of arthritis, knee osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. The study is believed to be the largest randomized trial so far to examine the effect of yoga on physical and psychological health and quality of life among people with arthritis.Results were published in the April issue of the Journal of Rheumatology.“There’s a real surge of interest in yoga as a complementary therapy, with 1 in 10 people in the U.S. now practicing yoga to improve their health and fitness,” says Susan J. Bartlett, Ph.D., an adjunct associate professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins and associate professor at McGill University “Yoga may be especially well suited to people with arthritis because it combines physical activity with potent stress management and relaxation techniques, and focuses on respecting limitations that can change from day to day.” Emailcenter_img Share on Twitter Pinterest Arthritis, the leading cause of disability, affects 1 in 5 adults, most of whom are under 65 years of age. Without proper management, arthritis affects not only mobility, but also overall health and well-being, participation in valued activities, and quality of life. There is no cure for arthritis, but one important way to manage arthritis is to remain active. Yet up to 90% of people with arthritis are less active than public health guidelines suggest, perhaps due to arthritis symptoms such as pain and stiffness, but also because they are unsure of how best to remain active.The study recruited 75 people with either knee osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. Participants were randomly assigned to either a wait list or eight weeks of twice-weekly yoga classes, plus a weekly practice session at home. Participants’ physical and mental wellbeing was assessed before and after the yoga session by researchers who did not know which group the participants had been assigned to.Compared with the control group, those doing yoga reported a 20% improvement in pain, energy levels, mood and physical function, including their ability to complete physical tasks at work and home. Walking speed also improved to a smaller extent, though there was little difference between the groups in tests of balance and upper body strength. Improvements in those who completed yoga was still apparent nine months later.Clifton O. Bingham III, M.D., associate professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of the Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center, says the idea for the study grew out of his experiences treating patients with arthritis. “It was watching what happened with my patients and the changes in their lives as a result of practicing yoga that got me interested in the first place.”Safety was a priority in the study, the authors say. “For people with other conditions, yoga has been shown to improve pain, pain-related disability and mood,” says Bingham. “But there were no well-controlled trial of yoga that could tell us if it was safe and effective for people with arthritis, and many health professionals have concerns about how yoga might affect vulnerable joints given the emphasis on changing positions and on being flexible. Our first step was to ensure that yoga was reasonable and safe option for people with arthritis. Our instructors were experienced yoga therapists with additional training to modify poses to accommodate individual abilities.” Participants were screened by their doctors prior to joining the study, and continued to take their regular arthritis medication during the study.The researchers have developed a checklist to make it easier for doctors to safely recommend yoga to their patients, Bingham says. People with arthritis who are considering yoga should “talk with their doctors about which specific joints are of concern, and about modifications to poses,” suggests Bingham. “Find a teacher who asks the right questions about limitations and works closely with you as an individual. Start with gentle yoga classes. Practice acceptance of where you are and what your body can do on any given day.”last_img read more

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Physical activity, sadness, and suicidality in bullied US adolescents

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first_imgPinterest Share on Facebook LinkedIn Share Share on Twittercenter_img Email A study to be published in the October 2015 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP) reports that exercise for 4 or more days per week is associated with an approximate 23% reduction in both suicidal ideation and attempt in bullied adolescents in the U.S.Across the U.S., nearly 20% of students report being bullied on school property. Bullying is associated with academic struggle, low self-esteem, anxiety, depression, substance abuse, and self-harm. Exercise has been widely reported to have robust positive effects on mental health including reduction in depression, anxiety, and substance abuse.Using data from a nationally representative sample of youth who participated in the National Youth Risk Behavior Survey (CDC), a group of researchers led by Dr. Jeremy Sibold of the University of Vermont, examined the relationship between exercise frequency, sadness, and suicidal ideation and attempt in 13,583 U.S. adolescents in grades 9-12. The authors hypothesized that exercise frequency would be inversely related to sadness and suicidality and that these benefits would extend to bullying victims. Overall, 30% of students studied reported sadness for 2 or more weeks in the previous year; 22.2% and 8.2% reported suicidal ideation and suicidal attempt in the same time period. Bullied students were twice as likely to report sadness, and three times as likely to report suicidal ideation or attempt when compared to peers who were not bullied. Exercise on 4 or more days per week was associated with significant reductions in sadness, suicidal ideation, and suicidal attempt in all students. In particular, the data showed a startling 23% reduction in both suicidal ideation and suicidal attempt in bullied students who exercised 4 or more days per week.Based on these findings, the authors concluded that exercise may represent a safe, economical, and potentially highly effective option in the response to bullying in schools. Bullying is a severe and growing public health burden with consequences reported across the life span. More research is necessary to further define the mechanisms behind these findings as well as the role that exercise can play in reducing the often severe mental health consequences for victims. Further, the paper raises the possibility of exercise programs as a public health approach to reduce suicidal behavior in all adolescents. This is particularly important consideration due to the fact that many high schools in our country have little or no exercise programs for non-varsity athletes.last_img read more

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Psychologists tried and failed to use telenovelas for mind control

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first_imgPinterest The psychologists then followed up to see if, and how, the messages influenced viewers. After the episodes aired, for example, researchers analyzed Google search activity and drunk-driving arrests. Their findings suggest that TV network should stop the fingerwagging: Stories with morals hardly inspire any action. While the Hispanic Scholarship Fund website saw a sizeable-but-fleeting traffic spike after the scholarship scenes aired, researchers saw no evidence that Hispanics were moved to action by pro-voting messages. And they saw no bump in Google search tems associated with the messaging themes.“In our study,” the authors wrote, “the airtime devoted to the suite of messages would have been worth millions of dollars, but the cumulative effect of these messages on the general population was small and short-lived.”As Neuroskeptic points out, this is far from the first time telenovelas have been used to push policy on the people. In the 1970s and 1980s, the Mexican government interspersed pro-family-planning messages into storylines to aid population control efforts. While the state’s experiment apparently succeeded, the duplicitous mind control tactics, once revealed, also hurt the shows’ credibility with viewers.More to the point, I’m not convinced the experiment was a failure. It was just poorly designed. Telenovelas are soap operas — by their very nature, they’re packed with melodrama and social hyperbole that’s taken with a grain of salt by viewers. Given access to a broader array of programming, researchers might have arrived at different results. After all, there’s no denying that current primetime television programs and streaming shows like Orange Is the New Black are effective at starting dialogues that lead to social change. Consider just the issue of trans-shaming — without Netflix’s Orange and Amazon’s Transparent, trans issues might still be back-burnered and underrepresented in the popular dialogue.Very Special Episodes may be a relic of the past, but conversation-creating television certainly isn’t. Psychologists just need to get in the writers’ rooms of Veep, Game of Thrones or You’re The Worst, and viewers will be putty in their probability-crunching hands.This article originally published by Van Winkle’s, vanwinkles.com, the editorial division of Casper Sleep Share on Twitter “Very Special Episodes,” a staple of network TV in the 80s and 90s, attempted to turn already schmaltzy sitcoms and family dramas into Important Works of Art. On a “very special episode” of Saved by the Bell, for instance, Jessie Spano caffeinated herself into a psychotic break. On a VSE of Full House, Stephanie Tanner nearly went for a joyride-gone-bad with some other kids. Laughable in hindsight (and even at the time), yes — but clearly memorable.Did these very special messages actually work? Did any viewers just say no to coffee or dangerous joyrides? Probably not, according to a new study, published in the journal PLoS ONE, in which psychologists inserted messages into three telenovelas (primetime Spanish soaps) and then analyzed viewer behavior.As a Neuroskeptic blog post explains, researchers teamed up with a TV network for the study, and injected eight types of messages into the programs (which pull in around 1.2 million viewers each week). Keeping in line with the very special messages of yore, researchers focused on health and safety (e.g., heart health, drunk driving) and civic responsibility (e.g., voter registration and scholarships for Hispanic students). “In total,” Neuroskeptic wrote, there were 23 scenes, featuring 16 minutes and 51 seconds of footage. The scenes were “not central to the shows’ plots” but “many involved the shows’ main characters.”’ Emailcenter_img Share Share on Facebook LinkedInlast_img read more

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Women in the fertile phase of their menstrual cycle prefer shaved male bodies, study finds

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first_imgShare Email Share on Twitter LinkedIn Pinterestcenter_img Share on Facebook The researchers from the University of Turku photographed 20 men, aged 20–32 years, with visible chest and torso hair before and after they shaved themselves clean. Rantala and his colleagues then interviewed 552 heterosexual women, asking them to choose between the hairy and shaved versions of the same body.“Interestingly, we found that the removal of body hair increased the sexual attractiveness of the male body to Finnish premenopausal women,” the researchers explained. This was especially true for younger fertile women, who preferred the shaved body more than the hairy body.Rantala and his colleagues also found that women in the non-fertile phase of their menstrual cycle were more likely to prefer male body hair than women in the fertile phase. Pregnant women and postmenopausal women were also more likely to prefer male body hair.“The finding that menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and menopause have effect on women preference on body hairs is a strong argument against the interpretation that change in fashion would explain why older women preferred more hairy men,” the researchers said. “Rather, it suggests that sex hormones might have effect on preferences.”The hairiness of a woman’s father was also associated with her preference for male body hair.“This suggests either that women are sexually imprinted for the hairiness of their father or that women’s preference for body hair is heritable,” the researchers said.However, the Rantala and his colleagues acknowledged that body hair itself might not be the physical trait that women are “cueing in on.”“For example, body hair could mask desirable male traits like muscles and a v-shaped body, which women found more attractive during the fertile phase of their menstrual cycle (see Little et al. 2007), and shaving body hair makes these traits more visible,” they said.It is also possible that hairless bodies are associated with a particular type of man.“On the other hand, in contemporary Finland, body hair may be a signifier (positive or negative) of some target of learned prejudice: social class, ethnic background, etc,” the researchers wrote, noting that Scandinavian men tend to have less body hair than men from other parts of the world.“Clearly, more experimental studies are needed to show whether changes in women’s preferences on body hairs with menstrual cycle are widespread among different human cultures before any generalization can be made.” Researchers in Finland have found that women’s preference for male body hair appears to change across the menstrual cycle.“These findings suggest that body hair may play a much more important role in human mate choice than previously thought and that biological factors, such as hormones and sexual imprinting or heritable preferences, may explain individual variation in women’s preferences with regard to body hair,” researchers Markus J. Rantala, Mari Pölkki and Liisa M. Rantala wrote in their study.The research was published in the journal Behavioral Ecology.last_img read more

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