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Holey Nanosheets for Wastewater Dye Removal

By on August 31, 2019

first_img(PhysOrg.com) — Researchers have discovered that extremely thin sheets of nickel oxide with hexagonally shaped holes can absorb hazardous dyes from wastewater nearly as well as the best traditional methods, but are recyclable. The research was reported recently in the journal Nanotechnology. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further The group, consisting of scientists from the Colorado School of Mines and South-Central University for Nationalities, in China, compared the performance of their nickel-oxide (NiO) “nanosheets” to the absorption properties of a powdered form of NiO as well as to activated carbon, a material often used for absorption applications because it has a very large overall surface area.In a similar way, the hexagonal holes in the NiO nanosheets also possess a high surface area. Each sheet has a polar surface, containing distinct regions of positive and negative charge.According to Colorado School of Mines scientist Ryan Richards, one of the paper’s authors, “Metal oxides like NiO have the main advantage that the absorbed material can be burned off and the NiO can be reused. Additionally, the polar surface of the NiO nanosheets may provide some advantages in adsorbing certain substrates. Methods for the recycling of activated carbon are often expensive and in this way and the carbon and the material it has absorbed must be discarded.” Richards and his colleagues tested the absorption performance of the nanosheets and the NiO powder using three common synthetic dyes: reactive brilliant red X-3B, congo red, and fuchsin red. These dyes are used for many industrial purposes, including paper and pulp manufacturing, cloth dyeing, leather treatment, and printing.The textile industry is a heavy user of dyes, consuming 60% of the world’s supply, and experts estimate that 10 to 20 percent of water-soluble dyes are lost during the dyeing process and released into wastewater. The dyes pose a threat to environmental health on their own, but as they undergo chemical reactions in the water other toxic and hazardous intermediate compounds are created.Various remediation methods exist, but physical absorption – using an absorbent material to “catch” and trap the dye – is the most common. Activated carbon is widely used, although many other materials have been investigated, including silica, clay, natural polymers, synthetic polymers, and various types of nanotubes.The group prepared solution samples containing all three dyes and stirred in either powdered NiO or a small amount of nanosheets. They found that the nickel oxide nanosheets could remove, on average, two to three times as much dye as the powdered NiO. The nanosheets still do not perform as well as activated carbon – for example, the nanosheets absorbed about 71 percent of the congo red dye while the activated carbon took up 98 percent – but they have the advantage that the absorbed material can be readily burned off and the sheets reused. The sheets are also inexpensive to produce and can be created using “green” methods. “We think that this means NiO nanosheets or similar materials could become the preferred media for dye removal in the future,” said Richards.More information: Nanotechnology 20 (2009) 275707Copyright 2009 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com.center_img Citation: ‘Holey’ Nanosheets for Wastewater Dye Removal (2009, July 1) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-07-holey-nanosheets-wastewater-dye.html New plastic is strong as steel, transparentlast_img read more

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Cambridge team uses solar cells in OLED screen to power smartphones

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first_imgvia IEEE (PhysOrg.com) — With the world’s showroom floors crammed with prototype smartphones promising advanced functions, bigger displays, stunning resolution, wouldn’t you think the biggest crowd-pleasers would dominate? The ultimate attraction in a smartphone, the one that never has to be charged again? This ultimate solution at least has scientists working toward that end, to bring in an easier time where users will not need to worry about the batteries wearing out. Colored solar cells could make display screens more efficient Explore further Citation: Cambridge team uses solar cells in OLED screen to power smartphones (2012, January 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-01-cambridge-team-solar-cells-oled.html More information:center_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2011 PhysOrg.com A thin-film system harvests energy from wasted light in an OLED display. Image credit: Arokia Nathan (via IEEE) A team of researchers at the University of Cambridge are getting closer. Their idea is to harvest energy from wasted light in an OLED display. They are working on technology where users will not need to plug in their smartphones for recharging at least as often. In their project, an OLED screen uses solar cells to absorb scattered and wasted light, sending it back into the screen. IEEE Fellow Arokia Nathan along with the Cambridge team have developed a prototype device that converts ambient light into electricity. Solar cells used in the prototype are made of thin film hydrogenated amorphous silicon, within the smartphone screen. Only around 36 percent of the light produced by an OLED display is projected forwards; the rest escapes around the edges, in the form of scatter and bleeding from the edges. The researchers worked on a solution where they could harvest what’s lost by installing photovoltaic cells on the back and sides of OLED screens to capture the loss. They also worked out a solution—a thin-film transistor circuit–to even out the voltage spikes produced by the solar cells, as fluctuations in the voltage provided by the solar cell could damage the phone’s battery. The device captures both ambient light and the otherwise wasted screen light leaking around the edges.According to reports, the team worked with the energy group at Cambridge’s Centre for Advanced Photonics and Electronics to integrate a thin-film supercapacitor for intermediate energy storage. The end result is a system that makes use of photovoltaics, transistors, and supercapacitor. The system would achieve an efficiency of 11 percent and peak efficiency, 18 percent.The numbers, for the smartphone user, would promise at least less strain on their battery. The Cambridge team’s effort is not promising “never-again” recharging but an ability for the user to save a fraction of power.More work is ahead. The team is exploring different circuit designs and materials with the aim of increasing the energy harvesting system’s efficiency. Nathan has said other energy scavenging schemes such as MEMS based kinetic energy harvesting may bring improvements.last_img read more

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Chemists discover a way to extract hydrogen from methanol at low temperature

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first_img Journal information: Nature (Phys.org)—A team of German and Italian chemists working at the University of Rostock has discovered a way to extract hydrogen from methanol at low temperatures and ambient pressure using a common catalyst. As they report in their paper published in the journal Nature, the team was able to use a ruthenium-based catalyst to extract hydrogen molecules from methanol without having to exert high temperatures or added pressure. Approaching ‘real’ aqueous methanol reforming. Credit: Nature (2013) doi:10.1038/nature11891 Citation: Chemists discover a way to extract hydrogen from methanol at low temperature (2013, February 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-02-chemists-hydrogen-methanol-temperature.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: Low-temperature aqueous-phase methanol dehydrogenation to hydrogen and carbon dioxide, Nature (2013) doi:10.1038/nature11891AbstractHydrogen produced from renewable resources is a promising potential source of clean energy. With the help of low-temperature proton-exchange membrane fuel cells, molecular hydrogen can be converted efficiently to produce electricity. The implementation of sustainable hydrogen production and subsequent hydrogen conversion to energy is called “hydrogen economy”. Unfortunately, its physical properties make the transport and handling of hydrogen gas difficult. To overcome this, methanol can be used as a material for the storage of hydrogen, because it is a liquid at room temperature and contains 12.6 per cent hydrogen. However, the state-of-the-art method for the production of hydrogen from methanol (methanol reforming) is conducted at high temperatures (over 200 degrees Celsius) and high pressures (25–50 bar), which limits its potential applications. Here we describe an efficient low-temperature aqueous-phase methanol dehydrogenation process, which is facilitated by ruthenium complexes. Hydrogen generation by this method proceeds at 65–95 degrees Celsius and ambient pressure with excellent catalyst turnover frequencies (4,700 per hour) and turnover numbers (exceeding 350,000). This would make the delivery of hydrogen on mobile devices—and hence the use of methanol as a practical hydrogen carrier—feasible.center_img Methanol, best known as wood or “spirit” alcohol, occurs in small amounts in nature. More commonly however, it is created using a catalytic process involving hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. It’s most common use is as an ingredient in making other chemicals, such as formaldehyde. In this new research, the team became interested in methanol because of its possible use as a liquid carrier of hydrogen.Over the past several years researchers have been looking for a way to store and transport hydrogen gas (for use in fuel cells to create electricity) in a way that is safe—most center around converting it to a liquid, a process that is difficult and requires a lot of energy. A better approach would be to use another liquid that has a lot of hydrogen in it and then to extract the hydrogen from it at the place where it is needed. One such liquid is methanol (12.6 percent hydrogen), but until now, extracting the hydrogen from it has required both high temperatures and pressure.In this new research, the team used ruthenium as a catalyst along with an alkali to pull the molecules in methanol apart in a three step dehydrogenation process that resulted in the release of hydrogen gas (and carbon dioxide) at temperatures of 65–95 degrees Celsius at ambient air pressure. Furthermore the team found that they could produce three molecules of hydrogen for every one molecule of methanol used, proof that it was a highly efficient process.Based on these results the team says it appears possible that methanol could be used as a liquid transport for hydrogen at some point in the future. There are some serious issues to be resolved before that could happen though, with the most glaring being capturing the carbon dioxide that is released during the process. Also, the process happens too slowly for use in a real time engine and needs to be made more efficient to reduce the amount of energy used overall. © 2013 Phys.org Explore further Homogeneous catalysis: ruthenium phosphine complex hydrogenates carbon dioxide to make methanollast_img read more

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Graphene plasmons used to create tunable terahertz laser

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first_img More information: S. Chakraborty et al. Gain modulation by graphene plasmons in aperiodic lattice lasers, Science (2016). DOI: 10.1126/science.aad2930AbstractTwo-dimensional graphene plasmon-based technologies will enable the development of fast, compact, and inexpensive active photonic elements because, unlike plasmons in other materials, graphene plasmons can be tuned via the doping level. Such tuning is harnessed within terahertz quantum cascade lasers to reversibly alter their emission. This is achieved in two key steps: first, by exciting graphene plasmons within an aperiodic lattice laser and, second, by engineering photon lifetimes, linking graphene’s Fermi energy with the round-trip gain. Modal gain and hence laser spectra are highly sensitive to the doping of an integrated, electrically controllable, graphene layer. Demonstration of the integrated graphene plasmon laser principle lays the foundation for a new generation of active, programmable plasmonic metamaterials with major implications across photonics, material sciences, and nanotechnology. Researchers build real-time tunable plasmon laser Citation: Graphene plasmons used to create tunable terahertz laser (2016, January 15) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-01-graphene-plasmons-tunable-terahertz-laser.html Explore further Journal information: Science (Phys.org)—A team of researchers working at the University of Manchester in the U.K has developed a tunable teraherz laser using the unique properties of graphene plasmons. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their approach, the four prototypes they produced, how well the lasers worked and the direction they plan to take to fashion the new technology into a usable device. Marco Polini with Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, gives a Perspective piece on the work done by the team in the same journal issue and offers some comments regarding where the technology may lead.center_img Credit: AlexanderAlUS/Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. A laser that works in the terahertz range would be useful in a variety of applications due to the ability of its beam to pass through such things as clothes or coverings on packages. Such lasers have been created, but thus far they have only produced a fixed wavelength, limiting their practicality in real-world use—that may change however, as the team with this new effort has found a way to create a terahertz laser that can be tuned on the fly.To build the new laser, the team looked to using a sheet of graphene as a replacement for metals in the laser, because its wavelength can be altered by placing it in an electric field. They started by placing a series of quantum aluminum gallium arsenide and gallium arsenide wells of varied thickness onto a substrate, which they subsequently covered with a waveguide made of gold. A layer of graphene was then placed on top of the gold layer into which the researchers had cut several slits to force electrons to tunnel between the wells. They covered the sandwich with a polymer electrolyte and used a cantilever as a means for tuning their laser.The result is a device capable of producing a terahertz beam, but not in a way that could be useable in everyday applications. After producing four prototypes and testing them under various scenarios, the team believes their device, which they describe as a “proof of concept” can be modified to allow for controlling the voltage that is applied to each slit, which would offer much greater control. There is also an issue, Polini points out, regarding the thickness of the polymer—it prevents the tip on the underside of the cantilever from getting close enough to the sheet of graphene to allow for precise control. © 2016 Phys.orglast_img read more

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Environmental messages that promote a return to a positive past found to

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first_img Moral values influence level of climate change action More information: Matthew Baldwin et al. Past-focused environmental comparisons promote proenvironmental outcomes for conservatives, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2016). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1610834113AbstractConservatives appear more skeptical about climate change and global warming and less willing to act against it than liberals. We propose that this unwillingness could result from fundamental differences in conservatives’ and liberals’ temporal focus. Conservatives tend to focus more on the past than do liberals. Across six studies, we rely on this notion to demonstrate that conservatives are positively affected by past- but not by future-focused environmental comparisons. Past comparisons largely eliminated the political divide that separated liberal and conservative respondents’ attitudes toward and behavior regarding climate change, so that across these studies conservatives and liberals were nearly equally likely to fight climate change. This research demonstrates how psychological processes, such as temporal comparison, underlie the prevalent ideological gap in addressing climate change. It opens up a promising avenue to convince conservatives effectively of the need to address climate change and global warming. Credit: Tiago Fioreze / Wikipedia This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—A pair of researchers with the University of Cologne in Germany has found that phrasing pro-environmental messages in past-focused ways was received more warmly by people who described themselves as conservatives than messages that warned of future problems. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Matthew Baldwin and Joris Lammers describe the study they carried out with online volunteers and why they believe their results could have a real-world impact. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciencescenter_img Explore further © 2016 Phys.org Citation: Environmental messages that promote a return to a positive past found to be more effective in convincing conservatives (2016, December 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-12-environmental-messages-positive-effective-convincing.html The scientific community has very strongly embraced the notion that our planet is heating up due to greenhouse gas emissions. Prior research has shown that people who identify as liberals have also embraced this theory, whereas those who describe themselves as conservatives have tended to be less convinced. In this new effort, the research pair have conducted a study that they believe shows a path toward convincing conservatives to get onboard as well. Their idea is that conservatives tend to take a brighter view of the past than other groups; thus, they might be receptive to arguments regarding global warming couched in more pro-past oriented ways, e.g., “Times were better when you could count on snow for Christmas in northern towns,” or “We planted bulbs in the garden on the same spring day every year.”To test this idea, the researchers enlisted the assistance of 1,600 online volunteers who were asked about their political ideology and then to read an environmental statement that was followed by a questionnaire. Volunteers were given different environmental statements to read. Some had dire warnings about future environmental disasters, while others painted a rosy picture of the past and suggested that there might be ways to bring back the “good old days.”In analyzing the answers given, the researchers found that those who identified as liberals offered the same levels of environmental concern regardless of which message they received, while those who identified as conservatives and read the pro-past statement rated themselves as more environmentally concerned than those who read the future-oriented message. In another experiment, the researchers asked volunteers to donate virtual funds to various causes after reading similar statements and found that conservatives tended to give more to environmental causes after reading pro-past statements.The researchers suggest that offering conservatives more pro-past messages regarding climate change might convince many of them that efforts to make environmental changes are desirable.last_img read more

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Researchers design dendritefree lithium battery

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first_img The researchers, from Profs. Yu-Guo Guo and Li-Jun Wan’s groups of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, have published a paper on the new electrolyte in a recent issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society.”We have proposed an asymmetric solid electrolyte, which can concurrently meet the requirements of a dendrite-free lithium anode and a low interface resistance in solid batteries,” Guo told Phys.org.As the researchers explain, the tradeoff in lithium batteries occurs because the lithium anode and the cathode have requirements that are inherently contradictory. While the anode requires a rigid electrolyte to block dendrite growth, it is difficult for a rigid electrolyte to maintain sufficient contact with the solid cathode, which creates a highly resistive cathode/electrolyte interface.To address this problem, the researchers designed an asymmetrical solid electrolyte, in which each side has a different type of surface. The side facing the anode is a rigid ceramic material that presses against the lithium anode to discourage dendrite growth. On the other hand, the side facing the cathode is made of a soft polymer, which allows for a strong interfacial connection with the cathode. The entire electrolyte is also very thin, at just under 36 micrometers.In tests, the researchers compared batteries with the new electrolyte to those with a conventional electrolyte. After 1750 hours of cycling, they found that the batteries with the conventional electrolyte exhibited rough morphologies indicative of dendrite formation, while those with the new electrolyte showed no morphological changes even after 3200 hours of cycling, indicating that dendrite growth was effectively eliminated.Going forward, the researchers expect that the dendrite-free lithium batteries will lead to energy-storage systems that combine the high energy and power densities of lithium batteries with improved safety and longer lifetimes due to eliminating dendrite growth. “We plan to design pouch cells with this asymmetric solid electrolyte for attaining a high energy density in solid batteries,” Guo said. Technique to suppress dendrite growth in lithium metal batteries A thin asymmetric solid electrolyte meets both the requirements of the lithium metal (blocking dendrite formation) and cathode (enabling low interface resistance). Credit: H. Duan et al. ©2017 American Chemical Society More information: Hui Duan et al. “Dendrite-Free Li-Metal Battery Enabled by a Thin Asymmetric Solid Electrolyte with Engineered Layers.” Journal of the American Chemical Society. DOI: 10.1021/jacs.7b10864 Journal information: Journal of the American Chemical Society By designing a solid electrolyte that is rigid on one side and soft on the other, researchers have fabricated a lithium-metal battery that completely suppresses dendrite formation—a major safety hazard that can cause fires and shorten battery lifetime. This design also overcomes a tradeoff that is typically present in these batteries, by simultaneously eliminating dendrite growth and reducing the resistance at the electrode/electrolyte interface. Typical methods cannot achieve both of these goals at the same time.center_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2018 Phys.org Citation: Researchers design dendrite-free lithium battery (2018, January 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-dendrite-free-lithium-battery.html Explore furtherlast_img read more

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Sufi is no music

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first_imgWe all have put these songs on our iPods and cell phones playing on a loop. Whether it be Sajda from My Name is Khan or O Re Piya from Aaja Nachle, we have all loved the voice that has crossed our hearts so many times. Ustad Rahat Fateh Ali Khan is the name that sets our ears smiling.  Ustad Rahat Fateh Ali Khan is the scion of a family whose name has become synonymous with a South Asian musical tradition ten centuries old which has only in recent years captured the imagination of listeners in the West. Khan is the heart and soul of the world music community. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’On a tête-à-tête, the maestro told Millennium Post about his new album, Back 2 Love. It is after seven years that the artiste has launched an album in collaboration with Salim-Sulaiman and Shreya Ghoshal. It would be a treat for it features 10 romantic tracks. Khan, on being asked about how he defines Sufi music, told us that there is nothing called Sufi music. ‘The idea of Sufi music is very recent. We in our family never created anything called Sufi music. We are creators of contemporary music,’ said he. What is Sufi then? ‘Sufi is someone who has no commercial interests. He who has no interest in the worldly pleasures is a Sufi. My music can give you the feeling of being a Sufi. The singer can be a Sufi. We all can be Sufi. You can be Sufi.’    Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe music today, according to him, is another area of music. He doesn’t describe them as good or bad music. The Ustad feels that any music which has a rhythm and a sur is good music. Clearly, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan has handed over his music to him. Khan has had years of training and relentless practice, and this background serves him well. He has mastered the art form of classical vocal improvisations, sargam and taan runs and raags (scales).Ustad ends by saying that ‘we need a Nusrat again to unite the world to one music.’last_img read more

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Delhi pubs restaurants entice crazy World Cup fans

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first_imgYou need not fly down to Brazil to absorb the excitement of the FIFA World Cup – giant screens at Delhi pubs and restaurants will capture it for you with awesome food and drinks to go with the thrills and spills of the game.Teams from 32 countries will compete for the one of most coveted crowns in world sport, football’s showpiece event, from 12 June- 13 July.Many popular pubs and restaurants in the city would be screening the matches live, offering some irresistible deals to tempt the football buffs. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’‘We will be showing the 9.30 pm matches live on our television sets and with some authentic Italian food. We have an offer for beer guzzlers – buy three and get two free’, Virender Singh Vohra, manager at Baci restaurant in Sunder Nagar market told IANS.Both the fans and the restaurateurs are disappointed that they cannot have more fun as the scheduling of the matches is in a time zone that doesn’t help public viewing here beyond midnight.The World Cup has five time slots in India – 9.30 pm(IST), 12.30 am, 1.30 am, 3.30 am and 6.30 am.  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixMost pubs and restaurants in Delhi shut by midnight, latest by 1 am, so that leaves the restaurateurs with just one time slot where they can show matches live.‘Last time in South Africa the timings were perfect. We put up a projector screen and showed all the top matches live but this year unfortunately most matches are taking place in the wee hours of the day’, Trilok Singh, manager at Gulmohar Sports Club, said.As the world warms up to the extravaganza, we at Jaypee Greens Golf and Spa Resort promise to take your football frenzy to the next level. Offers abound at Eggspectation, our 24 hour restro café and Matrix, the contemporary lounge bar. Cheer for your favorite football team with your buddies as you catch the excitement live on the giant screens at Eggspectation with special themeddishes and unlimited beer.Priced at Rs.1299/- per person, the FIFA Fever offer kick starts from 12 June to 13 July. Matrix with elegant ambience and live screening paired with finest of spirits, wines and concoctions, is ready to offer an unparalleled experience.  Relax and enjoy the champion blends by our expert bartenders and catch the global football fever live at Jaypee Greens Golf and Spa Resort.Where: Eggspectation and Matrix at Jaypee Greens Golf and Spa Resort.When: 12 June – 13 JulyTIMINGS: During live screening of the football world cup matches.PRICE PER PERSON:1299/-last_img read more

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KMC set to bolster antilarvae drive in view of incoming monsoon

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first_imgKolkata: In view of the forecast of rain in Kolkata in the next 48 hours, the Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC) has decided to intensify its anti-larvae drive.Senior KMC officials said that special cleaning drives will be held in the areas that have recorded more rainfall. Empty plastic cups and bottles, used tyres and empty containers work as mosquito breeding grounds. Despite campaigns to create awareness against dengue and malaria, many people have a tendency to not throw used cups and bottles into waste bins. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsUnused chairs and tables are kept on the rooftops of many offices, despite requests to clean them up. The civic authorities cannot clean the garbage of individual office premises and have to depend on the authorities. “We have requested the authorities to destroy the used and broken furniture kept on the rooftops but our requests have fallen flat. The sweepers can clean the premises but cannot go and clean the rooftops,” a KMC official said. He said cooperation of all sections of people is required to keep the city free from dengue and malaria. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedHe said the KMC Health department teams have been kept ready and they will request people through public address systems, not to store water in containers for more than three days at a stretch. The underground reservoirs and overhead tanks should be properly covered and no empty plastic cups, glasses and bottles should be thrown in the open.The KMC doctors have requested people to visit clinics if they suffer from fever for three days or more. “The examination of blood is free and if either malaria or dengue is found, medicines are given free of cost. The dengue clinics have well trained technicians and doctors,” they said.last_img read more

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New set of traffic plans to ease congestion on Durgapur Bridge Tollygunge

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first_imgKolkata: The Kolkata Traffic Police have come up with a new set of traffic plans to reduce vehicle pressure on Durgapur Bridge and Tollygunge. From October 30, North-bound vehicular movement will be done using the Bailey Bridge from 6 am to 1 pm. From 1 pm to 10 pm, only South-bound vehicular movement will be allowed using the same route.Police informed that from October 30, vehicles towards the North will be allowed on Bailey Bridge between 6 am and 1 pm to reach Alipore Avenue, Alipore Park Road for Central and North Kolkata. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeFrom 1 pm to 10 pm, only South-bound vehicles will be allowed along Bailey Bridge from Alipore Park Road, Alipore Avenue side towards N R Avenue for Taratala and Behala. Raja Santosh Road will be made available only for West-bound vehicular traffic from its crossing with Alipore Road up to Alipore Park Road. However, Raja Santosh Road will be allowed for both, if required. East-bound vehicular movement from Diamond Harbour Road will be allowed along N R Avenue from 6 am to 1 pm. It will become West-bound from 1 pm to 10 pm. Apart from this, vehicles coming from Western side towards Diamond Harbour Road will be allowed on Sahapur Road from 6 am to 1 pm. From 1 pm to 10 pm, the movement will be changed to East-bound for Diamond Harbour Road. During the implementation of the new plan, North-bound vehicular traffic will be closed along Taratala Flyover from 1 pm. North-bound vehicles for Taratala Flyover will be diverted through the western side at Grade Road of Taratala Flyover towards Taratala Crossing. Senior officials from the traffic department informed that during this new plan, vehicular movement on surrounding roads will be adjusted accordingly.last_img read more

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