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UVM one of first universities to end sales of bottled water

By on December 31, 2020

first_imgUniversity of Vermont,The University of Vermont will become one of the first institutions nationwide to end the sale of bottled water on campus and mandate that one-third of drinks offered in vending machines be healthy options. The decision marks the advent of a long-awaited systematic sustainable beverage policy after years of lobbying by students and the greater campus community.The announcement comes five months prior to the end of a ten-year contract with Coca-Cola of Northern New England that allowed the company to provide 100 percent of beverages in vending machines and 80 percent of bottled beverages served in retail, residential dining, and catering, totaling more than 1.1 million bottles per year.As of July 1, the university will no longer have a beverage contract with corporate sponsorship and exclusive “pouring rights.” Sodexo, operator of University Dining Services, the UVM Bookstore and the CAT Pause store will choose a mix of beverages through their own national contracts and local connections, allowing for greater flexibility in addressing environmental and social values in relation to the beverages supplied on campus.‘This change has been student-driven,’ says Gioia Thompson, director of the Office of Sustainability. ‘Students advocating for an end to sales of bottled water have dedicated many hours over the past four years encouraging fellow students to change their habits and persuading administrators to foster a more sustainable beverage system for the community.”The sale of bottled water (flat, unflavored water) in UVM’s 57 vending machines and in retail outlets will end in January of 2013, allowing time for the university to retrofit drinking fountains across campus, and for Dining Services and the stores to make adjustments.  Drinking fountains will be converted to bottle filling stations like those in the Davis Center with a goal of 75 stations spread across campus by the end of the year. The objective is for students to fill their own re-usable bottles with water rather than buying the water and then disposing of the plastic bottles.The campus-wide effort was spearheaded by the Vermont Student Environmental Program (VSTEP), a student run, non-profit organization created in 1988 to expand UVM’s recycling program and address environmental issues on Vermont campuses. Mikayla McDonald ‘10 and Marlee Baron ‘11, both former VSTEP presidents and senators on the Student Government Association, were among the initial group of students to address the bottled water issue and started planning Bring Your Own Bottle (BYOB) days and informational tabling events. Baron, who wrote her senior thesis on ‘Creating a Sustainable Beverage System at UVM,’ and McDonald crafted bottled water resolutions that were passed by the SGA.‘Marlee was the one who really brought the issue to the forefront,’ says McDonald. ‘It’s really an awareness issue, so our focus was educational outreach. Our efforts also coincided with our activities on SGA, so we had decent access to student government and other student groups. Some of the Eco-Reps (undergraduate leaders who foster environmental responsibility on campus by educating their hall mates about sustainability issues) had been working on bottled water issues for years, and we sort of picked up the cause. We wanted people to be aware of the privatization by companies of public water resources.’  Current VSTEP president Greg Francese continued the effort by helping collect more than 1,200 signatures from students in support of a resolution calling for a sustainable beverage system, surpassing the 10 percent requirement for an SGA resolution. Student efforts to reduce the usage of bottled water were already paying off as sales of flat, unflavored water dropped from 362,000 bottles in 2007 to 235,000 in 2010.The commitment to including healthy beverage options comes in response to interest by members of the Food Systems Spire in healthier beverages, with particular emphasis on the health risks associated with sugar-sweetened beverages. Healthy drinks may include flavored water without added sugar; reduced calorie carbonated beverages; flavored teas, fruit drinks and sports drinks with reduced calories; flavored beverages containing water, carbohydrates, and electrolytes; juices with 50 percent or more real fruit juice; and low-fat dairy beverages.According to the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, UVM is one of the only public institutions in the U.S. and among just 15 in North America to have eliminated bottled water sales from campus. Niles Barnes, project coordinator with AASHE who also provides support to the American College & University Presidents Climate Commitment, says changing vendor language to ensure healthy vending choices is an issue that is even less prevalent.Richard Cate, vice president for finance and administration, says the funds from the Coca-Cola contract can be replaced on some level by newer contracts with national and local vendors who will diversify the beverages offered on campus. Funds generated from new contracts will support student financial aid. Revenue from the existing contract has been used for student financial aid, student programming, athletics and operations. The Athletics Department will issue a separate request for proposal for beverages for athletics events, thereby creating a source of revenue for athletics to replace the existing one.The university will release a request for proposals in February for the vending contract, which has comprised less than 20 percent of bottled beverages sold as part of the 10-year contract. The new vending services contract will end in 2015, coinciding with the end of the existing university dining contract.UVM 1.31.2012last_img read more

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Closed road Velothon Wales hits the airwaves with Channel 4

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first_imgOther Dream Team produced programmes on Channel 4 for June and July include:AJ Bell London Triathlon – 29 JulyTenerife Blue Trail – 5 AugustGigantes de Piedra – 5 AugustUnited Airlines UK Challenge – 12 AugustTriathlonguard Long Course Weekend – 19 AugustAndorra Ultra Trail – 26 AugustOutlaw Triathlon – 2 SeptemberHaving established a close partnership with Channel 4 television, Dream Team Television is one of the UK’s leading production companies specialising in multisport, adventure, athletics and motorsport programming. The company has an international reputation for producing some of the highest quality programmes in these specialist areas.www.dreamteamtv.co.ukwww.channel4.comwww.velothon.com/events/velothon-wales The closed road Velothon Wales event, owned by IRONMAN, following its acquisition of Lagardère Sports in 2016, is airing on UK television next weekend. Produced by specialist sports production firm Dream Team TV, the Velothon Wales highlights show, presented by Kevin Harris and Anna Glowinski, is being broadcast on Channel 4, on Saturday 22 July at 06:20, Ch4+1 at 07:20 and via digital catch-up on All 4.With thousands of riders taking part in the closed-road sportive, alongside a UCI pro-elite race, the start and finish of the event in Cardiff on Sunday 9 July was positioned as a ‘spectacular festival of cycling’. With tough climbs and a backdrop of historic castles, the route takes in some of Wales’ most scenery, before riding into the Welsh capital for the finish, roared on by crowds of locals and spectators’ friends and family. Relatedlast_img read more

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WFSGI unveils guidelines to re-open gyms & facilities in context of…

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first_img Related International trade body, the World Federation of the Sporting Goods Industry (WFSGI) has released global guidelines to re-open gyms, fitness studios and aquatic facilities in the context of COVID-19. The guidelines are comprised of a key considerations document with accompanying risk assessment and mitigation tools.Available for download, the guidelines were developed by a working group, instigated and led by the International Health, Racket & Sportsclub Association (IHRSA), in cooperation with WFSGI and other industry federations and experts.The members of the group include:Kilian Fisher, International Public Policy Advisor, IHRSAHelen Durkin, Executive Vice President, Global Public Policy, IHRSAAndreas Paulsen, Executive Director, Europe ActiveProfessor Alfonso Jimenez, Europe ActiveEmma Mason, Vice President for Strategic & External Affairs, WFSGIPaul Hackett, Health & Safety ConsultantPaul Eigenmann, Standards Expert, QualicertRichard Budgett, Medical and Scientific Director, IOC (International Olympic Committee)Dr. Andrew Murray, Chief Medical Officer, European Tour GolfIn addition, consultation took place with ICREPS (International Confederation of Registers for Exercise Professionals) and EREPS (European Register of Exercise Professionals).The group’s principal purpose was to adapt and tailor the WHO Advisory COVID-19 guidance for mass gatherings, sporting events, and other risk assessment tools for application in the sports and fitness industry.Specifically, the group looked to offer advice to recreational sports clubs and facilities, such as gyms, fitness studios, sports halls, swimming pools, spa & wellness areas, and other ancillary facilities.WFSGI, through its Physical Activity Committee, has committed to raising the profile of the benefits of physical activity and to increase levels of physical activity, particularly amongst young people. One of the global consequences of COVID-19 has been that many of the facilities that people use to exercise and stay active have been closed.Though certain people have been able to adapt by being active at home or outside, this has not been possible for all. For those whose preferred form of activity is swimming, the lockdown has been particularly challenging, and has also caused significant problems for elite athletes in aquatic sports.COVID-19 has also had a considerable negative impact on the sporting goods industry, and the international trade organisation notes that it is imperative for WFSGI members’ business that people are able to return to sport safely so that their passion for being active and the industry’s products returns.WFSGI’s involvement in the Working Group has therefore had two overarching purposes; namely to help deliver practical guidance for gyms and fitness facilities to re-open safely so that:Members of the general public have the opportunity to return to these facilities to attain the recommended daily levels of physical activity, andElite athletes are able to return to these facilities to train.“WFSGI is proud to have been part of the working group that delivered global guidelines to re-open gyms, fitness studios and aquatic facilities in the context of COVID-19,” said Robbert de Kock, WFSGI President & CEO.“COVID-19 has caused unprecedented damage to the global economy. We believe these guidelines are a good demonstration of the benefits of multi-stakeholder cooperation to find solutions for the fallout from the greatest public health crisis in living memory. We thank IHRSA for their leadership in this matter.”Emma Mason, WFSGI Vice-President for Strategy and External Affairs, said “We know that the safe re-opening of gym and fitness studios will help many people globally to be more physically active after lockdown and that is key to both the global health recovery and the recovery of our members’ businesses.”While the guidelines have been developed using the best information available, WFSGI notes that the documentation is intended purely as guidance to be utilised at the user’s own risk and is provided ‘as is’ without any warranty and/or representations of any kind.No responsibility or liability is accepted by IHRSA, WFSGI, Europe Active or by any person (legal or natural) who has been in any way concerned with the development of the guidelines for their accuracy, content, completeness, legality or reliability. No warranties and/or representations of any kind are given as to the suitability or otherwise of the information to the user’s particular circumstances.www.wfsgi.orglast_img read more

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Physical activity, sadness, and suicidality in bullied US adolescents

By on November 19, 2020

first_imgPinterest Share on Facebook LinkedIn Share Share on Twittercenter_img Email A study to be published in the October 2015 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP) reports that exercise for 4 or more days per week is associated with an approximate 23% reduction in both suicidal ideation and attempt in bullied adolescents in the U.S.Across the U.S., nearly 20% of students report being bullied on school property. Bullying is associated with academic struggle, low self-esteem, anxiety, depression, substance abuse, and self-harm. Exercise has been widely reported to have robust positive effects on mental health including reduction in depression, anxiety, and substance abuse.Using data from a nationally representative sample of youth who participated in the National Youth Risk Behavior Survey (CDC), a group of researchers led by Dr. Jeremy Sibold of the University of Vermont, examined the relationship between exercise frequency, sadness, and suicidal ideation and attempt in 13,583 U.S. adolescents in grades 9-12. The authors hypothesized that exercise frequency would be inversely related to sadness and suicidality and that these benefits would extend to bullying victims. Overall, 30% of students studied reported sadness for 2 or more weeks in the previous year; 22.2% and 8.2% reported suicidal ideation and suicidal attempt in the same time period. Bullied students were twice as likely to report sadness, and three times as likely to report suicidal ideation or attempt when compared to peers who were not bullied. Exercise on 4 or more days per week was associated with significant reductions in sadness, suicidal ideation, and suicidal attempt in all students. In particular, the data showed a startling 23% reduction in both suicidal ideation and suicidal attempt in bullied students who exercised 4 or more days per week.Based on these findings, the authors concluded that exercise may represent a safe, economical, and potentially highly effective option in the response to bullying in schools. Bullying is a severe and growing public health burden with consequences reported across the life span. More research is necessary to further define the mechanisms behind these findings as well as the role that exercise can play in reducing the often severe mental health consequences for victims. Further, the paper raises the possibility of exercise programs as a public health approach to reduce suicidal behavior in all adolescents. This is particularly important consideration due to the fact that many high schools in our country have little or no exercise programs for non-varsity athletes.last_img read more

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Studies detail Ebola spread, response steps

By on November 18, 2020

first_imgFrench and Guinean researchers today noted how chains of transmission helped Ebola spread in Conakry, Guinea, the first of the region’s capital cities to be hit by the virus, and US officials released three detailed reports on outbreak response.The Conakry team looked at seven transmission chains that occurred in the area from March to August 2014. They reported their findings in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.Ebola infections have been occurring in Conakry for 10 months, with the virus first arriving from Donka, sparking the first wave of infections.Urban challengesThe team’s analysis of transmission chains found that officials thought they had the first illnesses contained, but an uncooperative family was linked to latent infections that likely sparked a second wave. A third wave of illnesses was sparked by virus reintroduction from Sierra Leone.Transmission chains in Conakry spread to two other areas of Guinea, highlighting the challenge of battling the disease for large urban centers when populations are highly mobile, the authors noted.The group’s analysis also found that hospital transmission was high in March, but quickly fell, with health workers playing little role in the spread of the virus. However, they said a second “super-spreading” event was connected to a hospital in July and caused by loosening of earlier controls.Funeral-linked spread of the disease decreased as controls were put in place, and most Ebola transmission took place in the community and among families.They said a more detailed spatial analysis factoring in mobility and demographic data are needed to make stronger conclusions about the role urban areas play in the spread of Ebola.Writing in a commentary on the study, Christian Drosten, MD, a virologist at the University of Bonn, said transmission reductions due to controls at funerals is an encouraging message from the first African capital affected by the disease. He added, though, that the level of disease in the community was enough to keep the outbreak in the city going.Further, he said hospital admission was the only measure that appeared to slow the spread of the disease in the community.Two independent introductions into Conakry during the study period suggest that the city was the recipient rather than the amplifier of outbreaks, Drosten wrote, adding that a surge of infections in November underscores that point.Contact tracing after Texas caseIn the first of three reports today in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), extra flight contact tracing measures undertaken after a Texas nurse took two flights shortly before getting sick with Ebola in October identified 268 people from nine states, none of whom got sick with the virus.Health officials from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and their state partners who helped with the investigation noted that nurse Amber Vinson flew from Dallas to Cleveland on Oct 10, returning to Dallas on Oct 13, the day before she reported symptoms.The CDC said it went beyond its normal protocols to protect public health and address the public’s concerns. The investigation found that Vinson didn’t experience vomiting or diarrhea during the flights.Of the contacts, 28 passengers, 3 flight crew members, and 1 member of the cleaning crew reported possible Ebola symptoms during the 21-day monitoring period. Only one person—a contact who had fever and respiratory symptoms—was tested for Ebola, and tests on days 1 and 3 of symptoms were negative.After it was clear that disease dynamics hadn’t changes, the CDC eased its guidance on passengers that were deemed to be in the higher-risk groups. The authors concluded that their findings suggest airline transmission is low when possibly contaminated body fluids aren’t involved.Impact of treatment unitsIn the second report, CDC estimates on the impact of Ebola treatment units (ETUs) and community care centers (CCCs) in Liberia predict that the interventions prevented thousands of new infections and that the interventions when used together were likely had a bigger impact than either alone.Researchers used an Ebola modeling tool based on data from earlier outbreaks. Their analysis revealed that from Sep 23 to Oct 31, placing 20% of patients in ETUs would prevent 2,244 cases and that placing 35% of patients in CCCs and encouraging safe burials might prevent 4,487 cases. Both interventions used together during the same period would have prevented an estimated 9,097 cases, according to the study.The experts wrote that in large Ebola outbreaks, rapidly deploying both ETUs and CCCs can reduce the number of Ebola infections.Boosting surveillanceIn the third report, CDC and other scientists noted that Sierra Leone’s Ebola case surge in the summer and fall overwhelmed surveillance systems, with many cases not found until victims were dead, posing a high risk to communities.To help identify cases earlier and curb the spread of the disease, the International Rescue Committee, the CDC, and officials in the country’s Bo district developed a community event-based surveillance (CEBS) system to boost the response and regular surveillance.The CEBS system involved training local people to recognize key events, such as two of more ill or dead family members, a dead health worker, or a death in someone who attended a funeral.A pilot project of the system in Bo district showed high acceptance among community members and responders, and plans are under way to expand the CEBS system to other parts of Bo district and in different parts the country, according to the report.See also:Jan 23 Lancet Infect Dis studyJan 23 Lancet Infect Dis commentaryJan 23 MMWR report on flight contact tracingJan 23 MMWR report on ETU and CCC impactJan 23 MMWR report on CEBS systemlast_img read more

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Stewardship / Resistance Scan for Aug 01, 2017

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first_imgDoctors call for diagnostic stewardship to improve antibiotic useA commentary yesterday in JAMA argues for diagnostic stewardship as an additional strategy to reduce inappropriate use of antibiotics.While culture and non-culture–based diagnostic tests are necessary for helping establish the presence or absence of infection, the authors write, the process of ordering and interpreting those tests is complex. In addition, clinicians often order common tests for patients who aren’t exhibiting symptoms specific for the disease process. For example, they order Clostridium difficile tests for patients who don’t have diarrhea and urine cultures for patients without symptoms of urinary tract infection.The authors argue that the problem with these tests, especially the increasingly sensitive molecular tests, is that they frequently produce false-positive results or fail to distinguish colonization from infection. The end result is overtreatment and inappropriate antibiotic use.As a result, some hospitals have launched efforts to improve diagnostic stewardship by modifying the process of ordering, performing, and reporting diagnostic tests. Examples of diagnostic stewardship interventions include educational campaigns to teach clinicians appropriate indications and sampling for tests, removal of specific tests from electronic health records, and laboratory policies that include refusing to process specimens that are collected and handled inappropriately.The authors go on to write that while the most beneficial form of diagnostic stewardship has not yet been defined, and thoughtful application of diagnostic stewardship principles should be applied to mitigate any potential unintended consequences and maintain clinician autonomy, implementing diagnostic stewardship can improve clinical care by reducing inappropriate testing, false-positive test results, and over-diagnosis. And they say that stewardship will be even more important with the expanding array of molecular diagnostic tests.Jul 31 JAMA viewpoint           Commentary details success of antibiotic stewardship in Danish animalsTwo Danish experts detailed the initiatives behind Denmark’s successful antimicrobial stewardship efforts in food animals, highlighting a farmer overuse identification program, an antibiotic tax, and lab verification for antibiotic prescriptions as playing key roles.Their analysis appeared yesterday in a National Academy of Medicine (NAM) commentary.The two scientists noted that the use of antimicrobials in food-producing animals increased in Denmark from 2003 to 2009, partly as a result of more pigs in production. As a result of increased antimicrobial use, the Danish Veterinary and Food Administration established the “Yellow Card” intervention in 2011, designed to target pig farmers using high amounts of antimicrobials. It set national threshold limits for the use of antimicrobials in weaners, grower pigs, and adult pigs and could result in an injunction for farmers using too many drugs.In addition, Danish officials adopted two measures in 2013: (1) a tax on antimicrobials that favored narrow-spectrum antimicrobials and vaccines compared with broad-spectrum compounds and (2) mandated annual lab verification of intestinal and respiratory infections for prescriptions written for group treatments.”Together, these interventions, particularly those implemented [after] 2010, appear to have ended the otherwise increasing trend in antimicrobial usage observed since 1999,” the authors wrote. “The antimicrobial resistance levels in Denmark continue to be lower than in most EU countries, which is most likely because of the detailed research and monitoring of antimicrobial use and resistance in food animals and in humans.”Jul 31 NAM commentary US expert underscores vaccines as key element to fight drug resistanceBruce Gellin, MD, MPH, former director of the US National Vaccine Program Office in the Department of Health and Human Services, in a commentary today underscored the important role that vaccines can play in combating antimicrobial resistance.Writing for Stat, Gellin, now president of global immunization for the Sabin Vaccine Institute, outlined key steps to addressing the problem, such as developing new antibiotics and stewardship measures. He added, “Preventing infections in the first place will also reduce the need for antibiotics. That’s where vaccines come in as an important part of the solution.”Gellin also noted, “In the context of the global trend in antibiotic resistance, we have been undervaluing all that vaccines offer to both individuals and communities.”He noted that vaccines help prevent the rise of antimicrobial resistance by preventing bacterial diseases such as pneumococcal infections, bacterial meningitis, and pneumonia, but their use against viral diseases can also reduce antibiotic use by preventing influenza and other viral infections that are often mistreated with antibiotics.Aug 1 Stat commentarylast_img read more

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The motorcycle diary story

By on October 18, 2020

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Emerson enhances its gas anaylser

By on October 7, 2020

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Air Liquide supports solar-powered airplane

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first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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VIDEO: ORE Catapult Test Facility

By on October 6, 2020

first_imgORE Catapult’s open access dry dock testing facilities which include a simulated seabed and still water tanks provides a flexible and controlled onshore saltwater location for all stages of technology development.ORE Catapult works with subsea companies for subsea testing, demonstration and factory acceptance trials to de-risk and prove reliability of new devices.Typical projects include ROV and sonar device testing and subsea cable laying trials.Recent Projects:Tekmar Energy performed demonstration trials of TekLink® and TekTube® cable protection systems, designed to improve the resilience and longevity of underwater cable connections as well as reducing offshore wind turbine installation costs.Moffat2000 performed Wet tests in a flooded dock environment to determine the actual flow rate characteristic for the Moffat2000 subsea Stab Connector. Moffat2000 design and manufacture subsea pipeline products and skid mounted assemblies for the oil and gas industry.SMD conducted scale model prototype testing of RT-1 for CTC Marine and submerged testing of their first ever Fallpipe ROV for Belgian dredging company Jan de Nul. RT-1 is one of the world’s largest, most powerful subsea rock trenching vehicle for the burial of pipelines.last_img read more

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