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The motorcycle diary story

By on October 18, 2020

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Emerson enhances its gas anaylser

By on October 7, 2020

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Air Liquide supports solar-powered airplane

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first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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VIDEO: ORE Catapult Test Facility

By on October 6, 2020

first_imgORE Catapult’s open access dry dock testing facilities which include a simulated seabed and still water tanks provides a flexible and controlled onshore saltwater location for all stages of technology development.ORE Catapult works with subsea companies for subsea testing, demonstration and factory acceptance trials to de-risk and prove reliability of new devices.Typical projects include ROV and sonar device testing and subsea cable laying trials.Recent Projects:Tekmar Energy performed demonstration trials of TekLink® and TekTube® cable protection systems, designed to improve the resilience and longevity of underwater cable connections as well as reducing offshore wind turbine installation costs.Moffat2000 performed Wet tests in a flooded dock environment to determine the actual flow rate characteristic for the Moffat2000 subsea Stab Connector. Moffat2000 design and manufacture subsea pipeline products and skid mounted assemblies for the oil and gas industry.SMD conducted scale model prototype testing of RT-1 for CTC Marine and submerged testing of their first ever Fallpipe ROV for Belgian dredging company Jan de Nul. RT-1 is one of the world’s largest, most powerful subsea rock trenching vehicle for the burial of pipelines.last_img read more

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OOCL takes Germany

By on September 29, 2020

first_imgThe new vessel is the second of the six sisterships on order at the shipyard. The first vessel in the series, OOCL Hong Kong, was delivered in May and OOCL said earlier this month that all vessels in the series are expected to be delivered by the end of the first quarter of 2018.OOCL Germany will join the OOCL Hong Kong on the Asia-Europe LL1 service, which has a rotation of Shanghai, Ningbo, Xiamen, and Yantian in China; Singapore; Felixstowe, UK; Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Gdansk, Poland; Wilhelmshaven, Germany; Felixstowe; Singapore; Yantian; and Shanghai. From left to right: Mr D Y Park, president & chief executive officer of Samsung Heavy Industries; Mrs Akiyo Moue, sponsor; Mr Nozomi Moue, managing executive officer of Shinsei Bank and guest of honour; Mr Andy Tung, chief executive officer of OOCL.www.oocl.comlast_img read more

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Union announces new ‘gig economy’ employment action

By on September 28, 2020

first_imgThe GMB trade union has opened a new legal action in the campaign against businesses treating workers as self-employed contractors.  The union says it has begun legal action against logistics company UK Express, which carries out deliveries for web retail giant Amazon.UK Express is a courier company headquartered in Birmingham but is advertising for drivers across the UK. GMB has already begun legal action against delivery company DX and taxi company Addison Lee in its fight over the so-called ‘gig economy’.The GMB said UK Express drivers are workers, and potentially employees, on the ground that it claims Amazon can impose control on drivers, sanction them for ‘poor performance’ and require them to pay for van hire. The online retailer also requires drivers to be available for 15 days per month and money is deducted from a driver’s pay if they cannot work, the union said. Neither Amazon nor UK Express would comment. If drivers were classed as workers rather than self-employed they would be legally entitled to 5.6 weeks paid annual leave per year, the national minimum wage, increasing to £7.50 next month, paid rest breaks and whistleblower protection.In October last year, an employment tribunal ruled that drivers who brought a claim against taxi-hailing business Uber were workers and that Uber was wrong to label them ‘self-employed’. Maria LudkinSource: Andrew WiardMaria Ludkin (pictured), legal director at GMB, said: ’This is another case in a long line of legal battles around bogus self-employment. UK Express deliver for some of the world’s largest companies, in this case Amazon. The drivers delivering for Amazon – like Uber drivers and delivery drivers for DX – cannot be classed as anything other than employed when you look at the law.’Nigel Mackay, a lawyer in the employment team at Leigh Day, which is representing GMB, said: ‘We believe Amazon should require its contractors to provide workers with their legal entitlements, including paid holiday and national minimum wage, and to stop fining staff if they are unable to work.’A government review into modern employment practices, being carried out by Royal Society of Arts chief executive Matthew Taylor, is expected to recommend legal clarification of the status of ‘worker’ as a half-way house between employed and self-employed.last_img read more

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Thriving lessor

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first_imgSAAF Rail Assets Management Co, set up in October 1998 as part of the restructuring of Romanian State Railways, has quickly established itself as a business to be reckoned with in the rolling stock leasing market. Starting out with surplus CFR stock, it is hoping to turn over US$2m a month this year and is venturing well outside its home territory.SAAF has already struck a locomotive leasing deal with an Italian regional operator, and it hopes to have 60 motive power units on lease in Germany by the end of this year. Outside Europe, SAAF has 10 locos on lease in Iran and hopes for 45 more by December. It is also working on plans to lease 2000 passenger coaches to Iranian Islamic Republic Railways and is bidding to handle a coach refurbishment contract for Tunisian National Railways.Also in the company’s sights are leasing opportunities in Belgium and Gabon, where Belgian consultant Transurb Consult has an operating management contract.last_img read more

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Tanzania to exterminate three million birds

By on September 26, 2020

first_imgAuthorities in Moshi region in Tanzania’s lower slopes of Mount Kilimanjaro are planning on killing about three million quelea quelea birds that are threatening 2,135 hectares of paddy reports daily news.The government is acting fast to avert losses of yield, as paddy is now in maturing stages and the red-billed weavers have proved to be hazardous, according to MOSHI District Council (MDC) Director (DED), Ms Butamo Ndalahwa in an exclusive interview with the Daily News.‘Quelea quelea, the world’s most populous wild bird species, have been devouring paddy at the Lower Moshi Scheme that spans 440 hectares; Mandaka Mnono Scheme with 270 hectares and the biggest one – Mawala Scheme that covers 1,425 hectares.’An airplane will spray 325 litres of pest-killing poison from the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock Development and Fisheries in Dar es Salaam to eliminate the birds. At least 2 million birds were eliminated in August but a new group of the birds has been arriving.“The last time MDC killed quelea quelea was in 2013 but this time around we have found it important to do a major operation as farmers are in danger of losing their crops. The red-billed birds have an estimated adult breeding population of 1.5 billion pairs. The overall world population is expected to be as large as 10 billion.”Quelea quelea birds feed on annual grasses, seeds and grain, they meet in large numbers to find a suitable feeding place and can cause serious damage on crops. The birds live in steppe and savannah regions in Africa.last_img read more

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Egypt’s Omar Assar to Miss Nigeria Open After Winning the 2019 ITTF Africa Cup…

By on September 21, 2020

first_imgLAGOS – An exhausted Omar Assar says he wants to “catch my breath” as he cannot “play three tournaments together in such a high level” and will, therefore, miss the ITTF Challenge Plus Nigeria Open to recuperate well enough for the African Games in Morocco later this month. Assar defeated compatriot Ahmed Ali Saleh 3-2 [10-12, 11-3, 11-6, 12-14, 11-3, 9-11, 11-3] in a tight and gripping final at the Molade Okoya-Thomas Indoor Sports Hall of the Teslim  Balogun Stadium, Lagos to win a third Africa Cup title on Monday.Prior to that victory, he’d also won gold as part of the ENPPI team at the African Club Championships which held at the same venue and with the Africa Games which also serves as qualifiers for the 2020 Olympics Games in Tokyo less than two weeks away, the 28-year old says he prefers to save  from a burnout before the games commence on the 19th of August in Morocco.  “I cannot play three tournaments together in such a high level, I would like to take a break and catch my breath and to start again preparing for Morocco,” Assar declared after winning the 2019 Africa Cup with which he secured a place at the 2019 Table Tennis World Cup in Chengdu, China in October.And speaking about expectations for the Egyptian table tennis contingent to the games, Assar would only say his side will “stay together” and “play like a team” but expects a tough challenge from countries such as Nigeria and Senegal.“The African Games is very hard now we have Senegal, they’re in the show and have a strong team, and of course we have plenty of respect for the Nigerian team, they have Quadri Aruna, he’s a world star and now [Olajide] Omotayo is also playing well, [Bode] Abiodun and so many other players and so it’s very hard to expect something from the All African Games.“But what I can just focus is on our performance. We stay together, we play like a team and this is what we can promise,” Assar said.Relatedlast_img read more

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Hubert Lawrence | An Army of Gold

By on September 20, 2020

first_imgWe were all so track drunk from the extended 2019 athletics season that the 7th World Military Games didn’t register a blip on the sports radar. The winners in Wuhan, China, late last month included Salwa Eid Naser of Bahrain, 400-metre world champion in Doha, Russian hurdles ace Sergey Shubenkov and Brazil’s Pan-Am shot put victor Darlan Romani. It wasn’t until I saw a Youtube video of China playing Greece in the Games table tennis competition that a eureka thought hit the target. Days after a Gleaner interview cited Julian Robinson, coach of world discus silver medallist Fedrick Dacres, fretting about how a lack of financial support was threatening Jamaica’s throws movement, world number two Fan Zhendong led China into battle against a Greek team anchored by former world top 10 player Kalinikos Kreanga. Like Eid Naser, Shubenkov and Romani, Fan and backhand topspin king Kreanga are soldiers, sort of. As the Chinese and the Greeks slugged it out, a possible solution for Jamaica became clear. ARMED SPORTING DIVISION Instead of leaving unsponsored athletes to fend for themselves when they leave college, Jamaica could have them enlist in sporting divisions of the armed forces. It’s nothing new. In many other countries, athletes are supported that way. Often, they do token service but spend most of their time training and competing. Robinson was lamenting the loss to Jamaica of 2016 discus Olympians Kellion Knibb and Tarasue Barnett, and wishing there was support forthcoming to prevent the same fate snaring 2018 NCAA Champion Shadae Lawrence when she graduates from Colorado State University next month. The good news is that Barnett is back in training and will seek to make her second Olympic team next year. Our armed forces have facilitated sports in the past. Roxbert Martin, the 1996 Olympic 400-metre finalist and 4×400 bronze medallist, was a policeman. The JDF has always been a friend of sport, with programmes in track, football, cricket and table tennis. However, an expanded programme is needed to keep elite prospects going beyond their years in college. These prospects could be on the payroll while training elsewhere. Alternately, the JDF has a gym and playfield at Up Park Camp and that could be a training ground for others who need a way station between college scholarships and professional contracts. This expanded armed forces sports programme wouldn’t only help young Olympic hopefuls. It could also extend the careers of world-class veterans in areas when Jamaica isn’t blessed with quality. For example, Kreanga was a World Championship semi-finalist in 2003, but the support the 47 year-old receives from the army and his other sponsors has kept him at the table as an inspiration to 19 year-old Ioannis Sgouropoulos, the European Junior champion. FILLING DISCUS GAP It’s win-win-win. Small countries don’t generate armies of world beaters, and every means necessary should be taken to make all the good prospects reach their full potential. The premature loss of Knibb, who was the national women’s discus record holder before Lawrence, and others like her, creates a gap Jamaica won’t easily fill. For that reason, it’s plain good sense to look at the dozens of countries who ‘employ’ athletes to their armed forces. A dub version of that blueprint will keep more of Jamaica’s Olympic prospects going and increase the nation’s chance of reaching new heights. In disciplines where expertise comes with experience, like the field events, such a programme could be worth its weight in gold. Hubert Lawrence is a sports analyst and commentator.last_img read more

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